cosmetic


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cosmetic

 [koz-met´ik]
1. beautifying; tending to preserve, restore, or confer comeliness.
2. a beautifying substance or preparation.
3. pertaining to surgical correction of a physical defect.

cos·met·ic

(koz-met'ik),
1. Referring to surgical procedures intended to improve appearance; specifically relates to correction of deformities that result from heredity or aging and not caused by congenital anomalies, disease, trauma, or tumors.
2. Relating to the use of cosmetics.

cosmetic

/cos·met·ic/ (koz-met´ik)
1. pertaining to cosmesis.
2. a beautifying substance or preparation.

cos·met·ic

(koz-met'ik)
1. Relating to cosmesis.
2. Relating to the use of cosmetics.

cosmetic

1. beautifying; tending to preserve, restore, or confer comeliness.
2. a beautifying substance or preparation.

cosmetic operations
see cosmetic surgery (below).
cosmetic shell
an artificial device, molded in the shape of a phthisic globe, and permanently placed over that globe to produce an improved appearance.
cosmetic surgery
surgery carried out purely to enhance the appearance of the animal. When it is for the purpose of enhancing or disguising its appearance in the show ring, this is considered unethical. The animal is not in a position to judge or to express an opinion and the question of beauty is adjudicated by the owner. Because animal fashions have sometimes tended to the bizarre there has been a marked turn in public opinion against cosmetic operations which are seen by some as unwarranted mutilations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jessica first learned about the possible risks of certain cosmetic chemicals when she started volunteering at a local grassroots organization called the Marin Cancer Project: Search for the Cause.
Since cosmetics are not subject to Federal Drug Administration premarket approval, mandatory establishment registration, or ingredient reporting, Wilson-Worst was ready to introduce her products to the world in 2006.
There's not any state or federal agency that actively reviews cosmetic ingredients for safety," she says.
If you do suffer a reaction to a product, report it to the FDA's Office of Cosmetics and Colors, Cosmetic Adverse Reaction Monitoring Program at (202)205-4706.
In the mass market, skincare and color cosmetics are sold in tens of thousands of stores, including cosmetic chain stores, drug stores, GMS outlets, supermarkets and convenience stores.
Instead, they arrive in the country and are treated in small, private offices rather than fully-equipped hospitals, says cosmetic surgeon Luis Da Cruz at San Jose's Clinica Biblica, who strongly advises against such practices.
In our example, the bargaining power of patients as the direct purchasers of the cosmetic procedures determines how much leeway you have with your pricing.
based Environmental Working Group (EWG), warned that women of reproductive age should avoid cosmetics containing dibutyl phthalate (DBP), a compound commonly used in nail polish and other beauty products.
Peiss spends many pages documenting the varied lives and techniques of female cosmetic entrepreneurs from well-known individuals such as Helena Rubenstein to unknown women such as Martha Matilda Harper, of Rochester, New York.
According to the American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons, more than 99,000 men underwent cosmetic surgical procedures in 1998.
And the process is now gaining recognition not only for enhancing strength, but for reducing cosmetic defects.