cosleeping


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cosleeping

(kō-slēp'ing),
Sharing of a bed by a parent and an infant.

co·sleep·ing

(kō'slēp-ing)
An increasingly common activity in which one or more children sleep with one or both parents. Clinical opinion is widely divergent on the benefits or harm related to such behavior (e.g., nurturing, long-term psychological trauma for both children and parents).

cosleeping

(kō″slēp′ĭng) [ con- + sleeping]
The sharing of a bed by several members of the same family or clan.
References in periodicals archive ?
It clarifies the association between cosleeping and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome for parents - but allows them to make their own choice.
The first thing the guidance asks health professionals to do is discuss the circumstances of cosleeping with parents and carers, as individual families may need to consider different things.
Wales was the first country in the UK to set up a national Child Death Review (CDR) system and this has already provided helpful advice about reducing risks to the infant from cosleeping.
Carmel McCalmont, head of midwifery at University Hospital, Walsgrave, said all pregnant women and new mums were advised against cosleeping.
We should all be breastfeeding, cosleeping and entirely giving ourselves over to our children all the time.
Among the SIDS infants, 54% died while cosleeping compared with 20% who coslept during the reference sleep for both control groups.
Despite a dramatic drop in the rate of cot death in the UK since the early 1990s, experts are advising parents to avoid dangerous cosleeping arrangements in order to help reduce deaths even further.
A spokeswoman for the Sudden Infant Death Register in Ireland welcomed the findings but warned cosleeping must be dealt with carefully.
Readers will find cogent and documented explanations for the potential benefits of cosleeping, how to minimize any hazards or risk factors, and just when, why, and how a parent should sleep with a baby.
This approach is distinct from the common practice, sometimes called "reactive cosleeping," where a parent responds to a child's insistence on not sleeping alone by sleeping in the same room with the child (sometimes for years