corticospinal

(redirected from corticospinal tracts)
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Related to corticospinal tracts: Corticospinal fibres

corticospinal

 [kor″tĭ-ko-spi´nal]
pertaining to or connecting the cerebral cortex and spinal cord.

corticospinal

(kôr′tĭ-kō-spī′nəl)
adj.
Of or relating to the cerebral cortex and the spinal cord.

corticospinal

Connecting the cerebral cortex and the spinal cord or pertaining to both. The corticospinal tracts are large bundles of nerve fibres largely concerned with voluntary movement.

corticospinal

pertaining to or connecting the cerebral cortex and spinal cord.

corticospinal tracts
nerve fibers in these spinal cord motor tracts have their cell bodies in the cerebral cortex. Some have crossed to the opposite side of the cord from their side of origin, some are direct.
References in periodicals archive ?
2] Compared with other fiber systems, it is typically observed to affect the corticospinal tracts after an injury to the motor cortex or the internal capsule.
white matter tracts: corticospinal tract, reticulospinal tracts and afferent tracts, e.
In humans, the corticospinal tract extends from the cerebral cortex in the upper brain down into the spinal cord.
Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring of the spinal cord during spinal cord and spine surgery: a review focus on the corticospinal tracts.
According to Fink et al3 criteria for diagnosis of FSP; subjects are diagnosed as definitely affected' if all alternative disorders have been excluded; the family history supports an inherited disorder; subjects report a progressive gait disturbance; and neurological examination shows a frank corticospinal tract deficit in the lower limbs including grade4 hyperreflexia and extensor plantar responses.
Additional characteristics include axonal loss within the descending pyramidal tracts as well as myelin pallor and gliosis in the corticospinal tracts.
1-3) Normal fiber tracts are also seen in the brainstem (including the corticospinal tracts, medial lemnisci, and superior, middle and inferior cerebellar peduncles).
This results in compression of the crus and subsequent damaging of the descending corticospinal tracts and corticobulbar tracts (Kernohan & Woltman).
MRI of the brain with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed to exclude dysfunction of the corticospinal tracts and the results were considered normal.
3) Demyelination sparing the tegmentum and corticospinal tracts results in bilateral ventral paramedian foci of normal signal providing the Mexican hat sign.
Brown-Sequard syndrome is characterised by disruption of the descending lateral corticospinal tracts resulting in ipsilateral hemiplegia.