corrosive

(redirected from corrosiveness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

corrosive

 [kŏ-ro´siv]
having a caustic and locally destructive effect; an agent having such effects.

cor·ro·sive

(kŏ-rō'siv),
1. Causing corrosion.
2. An agent that produces corrosion, for example, a strong acid or alkali.

corrosive

/cor·ro·sive/ (kor-o´siv) producing gradual destruction, as of a metal by electrochemical reaction or of the tissues by the action of a strong acid or alkali; an agent that so acts.

corrosive

[kərō′siv]
Etymology: L, corrodere, to gnaw away
1 adj, eating away a substance or tissue, especially by chemical action.
2 n, an agent or substance that eats away a substance or tissue. corrode, v., corrosion, n.

cor·ro·sive

(kŏr-ō'siv)
1. Causing corrosion.
2. An agent that produces corrosion (e.g., a strong acid or alkali).

corrosive

having a caustic and locally destructive effect; an agent having such effects.

corrosive sublimate
mercuric chloride; oldfashioned use as caustic, disinfectant, antiseptic. Called also mercury bichloride.
References in periodicals archive ?
ASTM G2051 is an industry guide for evaluating three important crude oil properties that can have an impact on internal corrosion: these are wettability, emulsion-forming tendency, and effect of crude oil on the corrosiveness of brine.
These shell characteristics all affect the rate tit which shells dissolve resulting from thermodynamic conditions: corrosiveness of surrounding media.
18) This rule requires water utilities to control the corrosiveness of water and, as needed, replace lead service lines used to carry water from the street to the home.
Industrial Applications: The product line includes pumps capable of operating in extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and/or corrosiveness.
The 1991 Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) requires water systems to protect drinking water from lead by, among other things, chemically treating it to reduce its corrosiveness and by monitoring tap water samples for evidence of lead corrosion.
Disadvantages include storage, corrosiveness, and fuel waste due to "crossover" in the fuel-cell membrane.
4%/yr from 1997 to 2001, due to environmental pressures and other issues such as waste disposal, residual monomer, limited recycling opportunities, and corrosiveness to molding equipment.
The thujaplicins are also involved in cedar's staining reaction with iron and its corrosiveness to mild steel digesters during kraft pulping.
Development Of Additional Tip Sheets On Topics Related To Substances In Well Water, Such As Color, Turbidity And Test For Corrosiveness.
The advantage of this technique is that you can obtain an instantaneous reading on the corrosiveness of the environment at any given instant without having to monitor long term metal loss, in short, an LPR will provide the average monitored corrosion rate as well as the corrosivity of the conductive fluid.
A large number of preservative and stain compounds have been introduced to the market; however, many of them have not gained commercial acceptance due to chemical toxicity, low efficacy, high cost, or corrosiveness (Murphy 1990).
Corrosiveness Assessment of Waterborne Coatings and Components by DC Electrochemical Methods -- Sarjak Amin, F.