corrective therapist

corrective therapist

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When Laura Hines began her career as a corrective therapist, the job title baffled people outside her workplace.
Wurzburger continued his education at the University of Illinois, but left in 1951 when he took a job as a corrective therapist at the Department of Physical Medicine at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Hines, Illinois.
This pilot program became a model for the subsequent 250-hour internship requirements for VA employment as a Corrective Therapist.
The Corrective Therapist brings his Physical Education background to the hospital in two ways.
In the first place, the corrective therapist accepts the physical aspect of exercise as implying the framework for corrective procedures in providing the basis for the mechanics of the procedure.
the corrective therapist is first of all an educator .
Without question the greatest contribution which the corrective therapist has to offer is in the area of Kinesiotherapy which is concerned with human movement and action .
In 1954, VA Central Office also published Technical Bulletin 10A-357, further delineating policies, procedures, techniques, and utilization of Corrective Therapists in VA Hospitals, Centers, Domiciliaries, and Regional Offices.
Certification and Registration In the early 1950s, APMR realized the need for a credentialing process to determine the basic level of knowledge and skills of prospective corrective therapists.
1954: Fleming, the Secretary of the American Board for Certification of Corrective Therapists published its first official registry with 549 names of APMR members.
Montalvano, Chief of CT, Brooklyn VAMC was named Coordinator of the Examining Section of American Board for Certification of Corrective Therapists.
He started his professional career as a corrective therapist in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Hines V.