corporate


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Related to corporate: cooperate

corporate

1. emanating from or pertaining to a group activity.
2. emanating from or pertaining to a company constituted legally under a Companies Act or similar legislation.

corporate advertising
advertising on behalf of a group such as a profession or an association. It promotes the group and escapes the stigma of personal aggrandisement.
References in periodicals archive ?
If Congress determines that ensuring the integrity of corporate income tax returns warrants an expanded scope and higher level of internal scrutiny than is currently required of or practiced by companies, TEI suggests that a public company's independent audit committee be required to annually reaffirm its appointment of the Chief Tax Officer (or other similarly knowledgeable employee trained in tax matters) as the individual authorized to sign the corporate income tax return.
Companies can use their corporate social responsibility track record to entice high-quality job applicants and to improve the morale of existing employees.
The extent to which conservative think tanks rely on corporate funding support varies widely.
Why, then, are there still many companies and CEOs who have not yet come around to embracing corporate governance?
Merger and acquisition activity, which was instrumental in shaping corporate financial patterns, was strong throughout the decade (chart 1).
At the same time, corporate debt has been rising steadily, actually doubling, since 1983 to more than $2 trillion today in nonfinance company corporate debt.
The Hospitality Group, Worldwide (THG) specializes in providing premiere VIP corporate hospitality services at international sporting events, in order to deliver the ultimate in prestigious and luxurious experiences possible.
Governments willing to bring forward on a national level long-delayed legislation on financial disclosure for corporate management and tougher regulations designed to curtail fraud in the financial industry.
Therefore, if a taxpayer did not treat a corporate officer as an employee and meets the other Section 530 requirements for relief from employment taxes, the taxpayer would be entitled to Section 530 relief consideration.
Globalization has increased the need for clear, consistent and central corporate messages with adaptation at the local level.
In view of the tremendous complexity of both the Income and Excise Tax Acts, TEI is highly concerned that even the slightest misstep -- a mere foot fault -- by a corporate employee could lead to Draconian personal penalties.
I say this because I recently served on a 50-person National Association of Corporate Directors' Commission to review corporate-governance practices in several critical areas.