coroner


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coroner

 [kor´ah-ner]
an official of a local community who holds inquests concerning sudden, violent, or unexplained deaths.

cor·o·ner

(kōr'o-ner),
An official whose duty it is to investigate sudden, suspicious, or violent death to determine its cause; in some communities, the office has been replaced by that of a medical examiner.
[L. corona, a crown]

coroner

/cor·o·ner/ (kor´on-er) an officer who holds inquests in regard to violent, sudden, or unexplained deaths.

coroner

(kôr′ə-nər, kŏr′-)
n.
A public officer whose primary function is to investigate any death thought to be of other than natural causes.

cor′o·ner·ship′ n.

coroner

[kôr′ənər]
Etymology: L, corona, crown
a public official who investigates the causes and circumstances of deaths that occur within a specific legal jurisdiction or territory, especially those that may have resulted from unnatural causes. Also called medical examiner.

coroner

Forensics-UK
An independent judicial officer who acts on behalf of the Crown to investigate the cause and circumstances of violent or unnatural, sudden or unexplained deaths. Coroners must be legally and/or medically qualified; most are now drawn from the legal profession. They are independent of both local and central government and required to act in accordance with established rules and procedures. Coroners generally have a team of support personnel.

Forensics-US
An elected or appointed public official whose chief responsibility is to investigate and provide official interpretation regarding the manner and possible cause(s) of unexplained deaths. Coroners often have law enforcement or funeral home backgrounds, but they may also be medical doctors who have run for the office of coroner. Coroners may hold public inquests to determine the cause and manner of death; they may have a doctor examine the body and report their findings at the inquest. Usually coroners have some law enforcement or legal powers, such as subpoena powers, but this varies depending on the laws in their jurisdiction. Coroners may be required, according to the jurisdiction, to interpret (i.e., “determine”) the cause of death if it was natural but the decedent’s recent medical history is unknown. US coroners investigate deaths that occur suddenly, violently, without explanation or natural cause, when the stated causes conflict with the findings at the scene of death or at post-mortem examination, due or potentially due to foul play, related to intoxication or drug overdose, and regardless of whether it was self inflicted.

coroner

Forensic medicine An elected–less commonly appointed–public official whose chief responsibility is to investigate and provide official interpretation regarding the manner and possible cause(s) of unexplained deaths; in contrast to a medical examiner, coroners are usually not required to be medical doctors, although the requirements depend on the laws governing the jurisdiction. See Forensic pathology. Cf Medical examiner.

cor·o·ner

(kōr'ŏ-nĕr)
An official whose duty is to investigate sudden, suspicious, or violent death to determine its cause. In some communities, the office has been replaced by that of medical examiner.
[L. corona, a crown]

coroner

A barrister, solicitor or doctor, appointed by the County authorities mainly for the purpose of enquiring into the cause of death in cases in which this is not immediately apparent or in which death cannot be certified by an attending doctor.
References in periodicals archive ?
A spokesperson for Rhondda Cynon Taf Council said: "Plans to centralise Coroner services from across the South Wales Central region have been agreed, which will see the main Coroner Court and Offices located in Pontypridd.
The presiding coroner intends to develop a disclosure protocol and will issue a consultation draft in the coming weeks.
Dr McClean said: "If coroners cannot agree on what caused a person's death, or whether the death was even reportable or not, then the desired prevention of future deaths becomes a difficult task.
Clare Bailey is currently acting senior coroner for Teesside while Malcolm Donnelly is her counterpart in Hartlepool.
If the cabinet agrees to joining the coroner services, the Ministry of Justice will begin a six-week consultation starting on December 8, ahead of a final decision being made.
Before he became a coroner, Mr Siddique worked in medical genetics, as a solicitor and as Chief Crown Prosecutor for Warwickshire and Deputy Chief Crown Prosecutor for the West Midlands.
In the wake of the Shipman and Patel scandals, the problem of the underreporting of medical-setting deaths to the coroner in Australia has received considerable attention.
New powers of the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 allow coroners to make enquiries to take wider investigations as necessary.
A new national code is to be formed to make sure all 96 coroners in England and Wales are working to the same standards.
Yet, he alleges, Coroner Owen is directing his efforts toward looking for the murderer of someone who may not have been murdered.
1) A person who finds an object which he believes or has reasonable grounds for believing is treasure must notify the Coroner for Treasure before the end of the notice period.
A lifelong Tranmere Rovers supporter, he was appointed Wirral's coroner in 1988, but has been involved in the Coroners Service for 46 years, joining as an Assistant Coroner's Clerk in February, 1963.