coronal

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Related to coronals: Laminal consonant

cor·o·nal

(kōr'ŏ-năl), [TA] Do not confuse this word with coronary or coronoid.
Relating to a corona or the coronal plane.
Synonym(s): coronalis [TA]

coronal

(kôr′ə-nəl, kŏr′-, kə-rō′nəl)
n.
1. A garland, wreath, or circlet for the head.
2. Linguistics A coronal consonant.
adj.
1. Of or relating to a corona, especially of the head.
2. Of, relating to, or having the direction of the coronal suture or of the plane dividing the body into front and back portions.
3. Linguistics Articulated by raising the blade of the tongue, as (t) in tip and (n) in night.

coronal

Imaging
adjective Referring to a coronal slice.

noun An imaging plane, slice or section made by cutting across the body from one side to the other, and thus parallel to the coronal suture of the skull.

cor·o·nal

(kōr'ŏ-năl) [TA]
Relating to a corona or the coronal plane.

coronal

Relating to the crown of the head.

cor·o·nal

(kōr'ŏ-năl) [TA] Do not confuse this word with coronary or coronoid.
1. Relating to a corona or the coronal plane.
2. Relating to a crown of tooth.

coronal,

adj pertaining to the crown portion of teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
7) The t-initial allomorphs occur only after n and l, not after other coronals.
In these cases, the choice between the h-initial and the t-initial lenition allomorphs is made by the fact that glottals are crosslinguistically less marked than coronals (Lombardi 2002), stated by the universal constraint ranking *COR >> *h.
For reasons that cannot be discussed here (because of space limitations), r is excluded from this generalization; coronals after r undergo lenition in the same way as after noncoronal sounds.
Section 4 discusses the phenomenon of Coronal Blocking, according to which lenition of a coronal is blocked if it is preceded by another coronal; I argue that the domain of this phenomenon is the prosodic word.
The phonological effects of lenition, stated broadly, are that stops and m become continuants (fricatives or glides), coronal obstruents (t, d, and s) become laryngeal or dorsal (a phenomenon known as "debuccalization"), and f is deleted.
As for the environments in which coronal fusion (and hence CB) applies, Ni Chiosain (1991: 108) states, "adjacent heteromorphemic coronal consonants undergo coronal fusion in certain word-formation domains, namely, in compounds and prefixed forms as well as in a clitic domain.
14) Coronal Blocking (lenition blocked) inside recursive pwords
15) No Coronal Blocking (lenition applies) between pwords within p-phrase