theorem

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the·o·rem

(thē'ŏ-rem),
A proposition that can be tested, and can be established as a law or principle.
See also: law, principle, rule.

theorem

[thē′ərəm]
Etymology: Gk, theorein, to look at
1 a proposition to be proved by a chain of reasoning and analysis.
2 a rule expressed by symbols or formulae.

the·o·rem

(thē'ŏ-rĕm)
A proposition that can be proved, and so is established as a law or principle.
See also: law, principle, rule

the·o·rem

(thē'ŏ-rĕm)
Proposition that can be tested then and can be established as a law or principle.

theorem (thē´ərəm),

n 1. a proposition to be proved by a chain of reasoning and analysis.
2. a proven proposition used in the solution of a more advanced problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to test whether failures of corollary discharge during speech contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.
Corollary 3 - Storage performance improves less than 10% per year.
2, we have the following corollary for the Dzoik Srivastava operator H = L.
And despite Intel's problems in delivering the Corollary chipset to market - Intel now says that product will be available in late summer - Shriner thinks that Intel will welcome Hotrail to the party.
Under the "reverse onus" corollary, would-be innovators would have to demonstrate that a technology was "necessary" because no alternatives were available.
This corollary suggests that on average exported goods |Mathematical Expression Omitted~ must use relatively intensively |Mathematical Expression Omitted~ those factors in relative abundance |Mathematical Expression Omitted~ and use relatively sparingly |Mathematical Expression Omitted~ those factors that are relatively scarce |Mathematical Expression Omitted~.
The corollary discharge is critical because it allows the worms to know how much they have turned their head in a particular direction, and to use this information together with the sensory input to direct their next move.
The corollary to the part about the winner going on to play in the next round, this is something that must be unique to soccer, as often as Dellacamera repeats it.
A visual corollary for this theory might be found today in the work of Olafur Eliasson, an enthusiastic examiner of horizons, orbs, and spheres of vision.
The corollary to this revelation is the importance of your ground-push.
The corollary is that robust government is not needed at the federal level, except for the military, and is therefore left to the Republicans.