corkscrew esophagus

corkscrew esophagus

[kôrk′skro̅o̅]
Etymology: ME cork, bark; L, scrofa, sow; Gk, oisophagos, gullet
a neurogenic disorder in which normal peristaltic contractions of the esophagus are replaced by spastic movements that occur spontaneously or with swallowing or gastric acid reflux. Difficulty in swallowing, weight loss, severe pain over the upper chest, and a characteristic corkscrew image on radiogram are the symptoms usually present. Management may include the use of antispasmodic drugs, avoidance of cold fluids, surgical dilation, or myotomy. Compare achalasia. See also dysphagia.
A neurogenic disorder characterised by periodically spaced, high-amplitude spastic peristaltic contractions of the lower oesophagus that occur spontaneously or are evoked by swallowing or gastric acid reflux
Pathogenesis Due to increased responsiveness to neurotransmitters or hormones
Management Antispasmodics, avoidance of cold fluids, dilation, myotomy

corkscrew esophagus

The radiocontrast image of an esophagus with periodically spaced, high-amplitude spastic peristaltic contractions of the lower esophagus, due to ↑ responsiveness to neurotransmitters or hormones Clinical 'Corkscrew esophagus triad': retrosternal pain, ↑ intraluminal pressure, uncoordinated muscle contractions, and dysphagia and weight loss; it may be asymptomatic; in the lower esophagus, the contractions may ↑ intraluminal pressure, producing transient pseudodiverticuli