cork

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cork

(kork),
1. The outer bark of the cork oak, used to make stoppers for some better bottles of wine. 2. A stopper made of cork or any similar substance.
[L. quercus, oak]

cork

a plant tissue made up of cells with thick walls impregnated with SUBERIN. Cork cells are dead when mature, forming an outer layer in stems and roots of woody plants that is impervious to water and air. The cork oak Quercus suber produces very large quantities of cork which can be removed and used commercially
References in classic literature ?
The raven followed them to satisfy himself that all was right below, and when they reached the street- door, stood on the bottom stair drawing corks out of number.
No, they hold there a large, round wad of tow and cork, enveloped in the thickest and toughest of ox-hide.
If she had had a cork she would have been a comfort.
Then he blacked his face with burnt cork and put the cork in his pocket.
Whether sea-going people were short of money about that time, or were short of faith and preferred cork jackets, I don't know; all I know is, that there was but one solitary bidding, and that was from an attorney connected with the bill-broking business, who offered two pounds in cash, and the balance in sherry, but declined to be guaranteed from drowning on any higher bargain.
It would be highly desirable that a cork model should be taken of the Castle of Mousa, as it cannot be well understood by a plan.
JEREMY bounced up to the surface of the water, like a cork and the bubbles out of a soda water bottle; and he swam with all his might to the edge of the pond.
The mighty cork trees, unenforced save of their own courtesy, shed the broad light bark that served at first to roof the houses supported by rude stakes, a protection against the inclemency of heaven alone.
There was a vast difference noticeable between these consummate apparatuses and the old cork breastplates, jackets, and other contrivances in vogue during the eighteenth century.
See here," continued he, drawing forth a small bottle and holding it before their eyes, "in this bottle I hold the small-pox, safely corked up; I have but to draw the cork, and let loose the pestilence, to sweep man, woman, and child from the face of the earth.
The bottle stood near them, two-thirds full, and beside it lay a long, deeply stained cork.
I shall cork it and screw the cap tight, and then I shall hurl it as far out into the sea as my strength will permit.