cork

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cork

(kork),
1. The outer bark of the cork oak, used to make stoppers for some better bottles of wine. 2. A stopper made of cork or any similar substance.
[L. quercus, oak]

cork

a plant tissue made up of cells with thick walls impregnated with SUBERIN. Cork cells are dead when mature, forming an outer layer in stems and roots of woody plants that is impervious to water and air. The cork oak Quercus suber produces very large quantities of cork which can be removed and used commercially
References in periodicals archive ?
dispar all stages from the cork oak were randomly taken in April and June 2007, during its development for biometric analysis.
Cork oak replanting provides tangible environmental benefits, but just as importantly it teaches people inside and outside our industry about the important role cork oak forests -- and natural corks -- play in the ecosystem.
More than half the world's cork oak woodlands are found in Spain and Portugal, which produce three-quarters of the world's cork.
A hi-tech process in which the natural cork is blasted with carbon dioxide is said to remove all traces of the taint caused by the chemical trichloroanisole, which can occur in the bark of the cork oak tree.
The country is the source of more than hall the world's supply of cork, which comes from the bark of the cork oak tree.
Cork, harvested from the bark of a cork oak tree without harming the tree, is also popular because it can be installed quickly without glue.
The environmentally friendly product is harvested from the bark of cork oak trees that grow primarily in Spain and Portugal.
Diners can help by donating corks to the appeal so they can be turned into a huge sculpture to draw the nation's attention to the value of the cork oak woods for people and wildlife.
These properties are due to the reaction of cellulose with suberin (the polymeric ester of phellonic acid and suberinic acids, among others), and are not restricted to the bark of the cork oak (Quercus suber), although no other plant structures shows them so clearly.
If the market moves to plastic, a huge industry will be destroyed and the lack of need for cork oak trees will have serious consequences to the environment.
Almost all of Catalonia's 75,000 hectares of cork oak grow in Girona, the northeasternmost of four Catalan provinces.