cork


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to cork: cork tree

cork

(kork),
1. The outer bark of the cork oak, used to make stoppers for some better bottles of wine. 2. A stopper made of cork or any similar substance.
[L. quercus, oak]

cork

a plant tissue made up of cells with thick walls impregnated with SUBERIN. Cork cells are dead when mature, forming an outer layer in stems and roots of woody plants that is impervious to water and air. The cork oak Quercus suber produces very large quantities of cork which can be removed and used commercially
References in classic literature ?
She had had a season in Dublin, and who knows how many in Cork, Killarney, and Mallow?
Here the cork is evidently taken out again, and replaced again.
The visitor first held the bottle against the light of the candle, and next examined the top of the cork.
Dissatisfied with the pacific aspect of a face which had no more than the faintest hint of flaxen eyebrow, together with a pair of amiable blue-gray eyes and round pink cheeks that refused to look formidable, let him frown as he would before the looking-glass (Philip had once told him of a man who had a horseshoe frown, and Tom had tried with all his frowning might to make a horseshoe on his forehead), he had had recourse to that unfailing source of the terrible, burnt cork, and had made himself a pair of black eyebrows that met in a satisfactory manner over his nose, and were matched by a less carefully adjusted blackness about the chin.
And besides, there were no champagne corks among the shells.
at sight of which Ilya Rostov blushed with self-conscious pleasure), the footmen began popping corks and filling the champagne glasses.
A second later they were rolling, splashing and bobbing about in the water, the horse struggling frantically to find a rest for its feet and its riders being first plunged beneath the rapid current and then floating upon the surface like corks.
We will suppose," I read, "that a small bundle of connected corks was launched in a sluggish current upon a voyage across the Atlantic.
Your readers will possibly comprehend that the Atlantic, in this parable, stands for the mighty ocean of ether through which we drift and that the bunch of corks represents the little and obscure planetary system to which we belong.
Raffles, however, had seen the place by daylight, and had come prepared for the special obstacles; already he was reaching up and putting champagne corks on the spikes, and in another moment he had his folded covert-coat across the corks.
Godfrey to say, between the corks and the carving) meant love.
Then, stepping into his extended hand, and condescending to be held out at arm's length, he gave vent to a succession of sounds, not unlike the drawing of some eight or ten dozen of long corks, and again asserted his brimstone birth and parentage with great distinctness.