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core

(kōr),
1. The central mass of necrotic tissue in a boil.
2. A metal casting or resin form, usually with a post in the canal of a tooth root, designed to retain an artificial crown.
3. A sectional record, usually of plaster of Paris or one of its derivatives, of the relationships of parts, such as teeth, metallic restorations, or copings.
4. The central part of a structure, for example, the core of a glycogen particle or teh core of a virus.
[L. cor, heart]

core

(kôr)
n.
Anatomy The muscles in the trunk of the human body, including those of the abdomen and chest, that stabilize the spine, pelvis, and shoulders.

core

Etymology: L, cor, heart
1 a kind of main computer memory.
2 Also called laboratory core.
3 (in dentistry) a section of a mold, usually of plaster, made over assembled parts of a dental restoration to record and maintain their relationships so that the parts can be reassembled in their original position; the retainer portion to which a dental restoration is attached. See composite core, cast core, cast post, and cast core.
4 the center of a structure, as in core temperature of the body.

CORE

Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation. A testing system for managers and practitioners working in counseling and psychological therapy services in the UK, which provides a framework for responding to the increasing demand in health and other sectors to provide evidence of service quality and effectiveness.

core

(kōr)
Made up of the rectus abdominis, transversus abdominis, internal and external oblique muscles. The muscles are used to stabilize the upper torso during movement.
[L. cor, heart]

core

(kōr)
1. Metal casting or resin form, usually with a post in the canal of a tooth root, designed to retain an artificial crown.
2. Sectional record, usually of plaster of Paris or one of its derivatives, of the relationships of parts, such as teeth, metallic restorations, or copings.
[L. cor, heart]

core,

n the central part. A section of a mold, usually of plaster, made over assembled parts of a dental restoration or construction to record and maintain the relationships of the parts so that the parts can be reassembled in their original positions. Also called a
laboratory core.
core, amalgam,
n the foundational replacement of the badly mutilated crown of a tooth whose purpose is to provide a rigid base for retention of a cast crown restoration. The core may be retained by undercuts, slots, pins, or the pulp chamber of an endodontically treated tooth.
core, cast,
n a metal casting, usually with a post in the canal or a root, designed to retain an artificial crown.
core, composite,
n a composite resin buildup to provide retention for a cast crown restoration.
core, laboratory,
a section of a mold, usually of plaster, made over assembled parts of a dental restoration or construction to record and maintain the relationships of the parts so that the parts can be reassembled in their original positions.
References in periodicals archive ?
to assemble, load and unload cores, plus two Electrovert LMD 2000 core-casting machines and two induction melt-out systems purchased through Electrovert and based on induction coils from Inductoheat.
Two Kuka KR 500 heavy-duty robots were chosen for these operations, but before committing to the automation project, Gienanth commissioned a feasibility study to investigate possible methods for picking up the cores and see how the cores would respond to the robot motions.
Research cores are no longer required as organizational units in the center.
With the availability of Windows Server 2003 x64 editions and Windows XP Professional x64 Edition, customers now have a mainstream, industry-standard 64-bit operating system optimized to take advantage of the performance and efficiency improvements of AMD64 dual-core technology," said Brian Valentine, senior vice president, Windows Core Operating System Division, Microsoft Corp.
For cores acquired from customers, cost is the amount of the credit offered to the customer.
The servo motor turns a specially designed worm gear that reportedly engages the cores more accurately than spur gears.
Dressler suggests that some of these bulging galaxies -- those with the most massive cores -- once shone with the blinding light of quasars, the most brilliant objects observed.
Quad-Core AMD Opteron[TM] Processors Designed for Automatic Adjustment of Individual Core Frequencies for Improving Power Efficiency in the Datacenter
The new 1000BASE-X PCS/PMA and XAUI cores can be used in the development of emerging 1 & 10 Gigabit networking and telecom equipment.
This project has also used the services of the Transgenic Animal Support Core to develop mice that have increased ability to produce GSH, and those of the Molecular Biomarker Laboratory Core to test for the expression of the genes associated with GSH production.