core

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Related to corer: Apple corer, gravity corer

core

(kōr),
1. The central mass of necrotic tissue in a boil.
2. A metal casting or resin form, usually with a post in the canal of a tooth root, designed to retain an artificial crown.
3. A sectional record, usually of plaster of Paris or one of its derivatives, of the relationships of parts, such as teeth, metallic restorations, or copings.
4. The central part of a structure, for example, the core of a glycogen particle or teh core of a virus.
[L. cor, heart]

core

(kôr)
n.
Anatomy The muscles in the trunk of the human body, including those of the abdomen and chest, that stabilize the spine, pelvis, and shoulders.

core

Etymology: L, cor, heart
1 a kind of main computer memory.
2 Also called laboratory core.
3 (in dentistry) a section of a mold, usually of plaster, made over assembled parts of a dental restoration to record and maintain their relationships so that the parts can be reassembled in their original position; the retainer portion to which a dental restoration is attached. See composite core, cast core, cast post, and cast core.
4 the center of a structure, as in core temperature of the body.

CORE

Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation. A testing system for managers and practitioners working in counseling and psychological therapy services in the UK, which provides a framework for responding to the increasing demand in health and other sectors to provide evidence of service quality and effectiveness.

core

(kōr)
Made up of the rectus abdominis, transversus abdominis, internal and external oblique muscles. The muscles are used to stabilize the upper torso during movement.
[L. cor, heart]

core

(kōr)
1. Metal casting or resin form, usually with a post in the canal of a tooth root, designed to retain an artificial crown.
2. Sectional record, usually of plaster of Paris or one of its derivatives, of the relationships of parts, such as teeth, metallic restorations, or copings.
[L. cor, heart]

core,

n the central part. A section of a mold, usually of plaster, made over assembled parts of a dental restoration or construction to record and maintain the relationships of the parts so that the parts can be reassembled in their original positions. Also called a
laboratory core.
core, amalgam,
n the foundational replacement of the badly mutilated crown of a tooth whose purpose is to provide a rigid base for retention of a cast crown restoration. The core may be retained by undercuts, slots, pins, or the pulp chamber of an endodontically treated tooth.
core, cast,
n a metal casting, usually with a post in the canal or a root, designed to retain an artificial crown.
core, composite,
n a composite resin buildup to provide retention for a cast crown restoration.
core, laboratory,
a section of a mold, usually of plaster, made over assembled parts of a dental restoration or construction to record and maintain the relationships of the parts so that the parts can be reassembled in their original positions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fine-toothed cutter was used in conjunction with the corer to minimise tearing of small roots.
Sampling devices include Piston Coring system (30m), Vibro Corer (8-10m), Grabs, Spade Corer, Dredger, Core Splitter, Core Cutter, X-Ray Core Scanner and Water Sampler to collect sea water at various depths.
Other pinched exhibits include a late-18th to early-19th century apple corer taken in April last year from Turlough Park House Museum in Castlebar.
Extensive sampling of manganese nodules using box corer, corer and epibenthic sledge
Minutes later the goals corer turned provider for winger Latta to make it 2-0.
The expedition is conducted under the password MANGAN in 2014 and has the following objectives Extensive sampling of manganese nodules using box corer, corer and epibenthic sledge; : Extensive video mapping of tuber fields by multi-function slide (video, photo, sensors); : Mapping with a deep-towed side scan sonar; : Manganese nodule samples using dredge material; : Quote of three moorings and launching four anchors with flow s
Playing a half-fit Harry Kewell left Morientes to play up front against arguably the best team in the Premiership, thus leaving Baros, our leading goals corer who gives 100% every game, on the bench.
He was a trys corer in Australia's 37-10 win over New Zealand last April but lost out to Broncos team-mate Shaun Berrigan for the Tri-Series opener in Auckland.
She made 205 international appearances and was the National League's leading goals corer in a distinguished career with England and Great Britain.
Liverpool's leading goals corer missed last week's defeat by Birmingham and the midweek cup win over Middlesbrough in which Mellor starred with two decisive late goals.
And they looked home and dry when a crisp shot from leading corer Kieran O'Brien put them two ahead.
The last real goals corer we had was probably Tony Cottee.