core


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

core

(kōr),
1. The central mass of necrotic tissue in a boil.
2. A metal casting or resin form, usually with a post in the canal of a tooth root, designed to retain an artificial crown.
3. A sectional record, usually of plaster of Paris or one of its derivatives, of the relationships of parts, such as teeth, metallic restorations, or copings.
4. The central part of a structure, for example, the core of a glycogen particle or teh core of a virus.
[L. cor, heart]

core

(kôr)
n.
Anatomy The muscles in the trunk of the human body, including those of the abdomen and chest, that stabilize the spine, pelvis, and shoulders.

core

Etymology: L, cor, heart
1 a kind of main computer memory.
2 Also called laboratory core.
3 (in dentistry) a section of a mold, usually of plaster, made over assembled parts of a dental restoration to record and maintain their relationships so that the parts can be reassembled in their original position; the retainer portion to which a dental restoration is attached. See composite core, cast core, cast post, and cast core.
4 the center of a structure, as in core temperature of the body.

CORE

Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation. A testing system for managers and practitioners working in counseling and psychological therapy services in the UK, which provides a framework for responding to the increasing demand in health and other sectors to provide evidence of service quality and effectiveness.

core

(kōr)
Made up of the rectus abdominis, transversus abdominis, internal and external oblique muscles. The muscles are used to stabilize the upper torso during movement.
[L. cor, heart]

core

(kōr)
1. Metal casting or resin form, usually with a post in the canal of a tooth root, designed to retain an artificial crown.
2. Sectional record, usually of plaster of Paris or one of its derivatives, of the relationships of parts, such as teeth, metallic restorations, or copings.
[L. cor, heart]

core,

n the central part. A section of a mold, usually of plaster, made over assembled parts of a dental restoration or construction to record and maintain the relationships of the parts so that the parts can be reassembled in their original positions. Also called a
laboratory core.
core, amalgam,
n the foundational replacement of the badly mutilated crown of a tooth whose purpose is to provide a rigid base for retention of a cast crown restoration. The core may be retained by undercuts, slots, pins, or the pulp chamber of an endodontically treated tooth.
core, cast,
n a metal casting, usually with a post in the canal or a root, designed to retain an artificial crown.
core, composite,
n a composite resin buildup to provide retention for a cast crown restoration.
core, laboratory,
a section of a mold, usually of plaster, made over assembled parts of a dental restoration or construction to record and maintain the relationships of the parts so that the parts can be reassembled in their original positions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pilot projects are primarily intended to 1) provide initial support for new investigators to establish new lines of research; 2) allow exploration of possible innovative new directions representing a significant departure from ongoing funded research for established investigators in environmental health sciences; ideas of particular importance in environmental health sciences are paramount; 3) stimulate investigators from other areas of endeavor to apply their expertise to environmental health research and environmental medicine; 4) foster opportunities that meet goals set out in the EHS Core Center Plan.
We partnered with Core Discovery instructors to develop additional information literacy components to incorporate in their courses and we worked with information technologists in the Center for Teaching Innovation (CTI) to develop an online information literacy tutorial.
After an extensive evaluation, Gienanth focused on two core handling operations--clipping into the core wash and palletizing finished cores--for its initial automation efforts.
31, 2002 (as long as the core valuation issue is not under consideration in an examination).
No matter what you're doing, it requires core strength to do it.
Up until just quite recently, the inner core has been thought to be an uninteresting, featureless place," says Bruce Buffett, a geophysicist at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver.
With the availability of Windows Server 2003 x64 editions and Windows XP Professional x64 Edition, customers now have a mainstream, industry-standard 64-bit operating system optimized to take advantage of the performance and efficiency improvements of AMD64 dual-core technology," said Brian Valentine, senior vice president, Windows Core Operating System Division, Microsoft Corp.
These shortcomings make it difficult for a hydraulically driven unscrewing system to meet the needs of parts with very precise dimensions, larger diameters, or many threads that require multiple turns of the core.
The Molecular Biomarker Laboratory Core develops gene assays and provides high-throughput genetic analysis.
Earth's core consists of two parts, an inner sphere of solid iron and an outer shell of liquid iron alloy.