powder

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powder

 [pow´der]
an aggregation of particles, as that obtained by grinding or rubbing a solid.

pow·der

(pow'dĕr),
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. In pharmaceutics, a homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry, particulate matter consisting of one or more substances; the degree of fineness of a pow'der is related to passage of the material through standard sieves.
3. A single dose of a powdered drug, enclosed in an envelope of folded paper.
4. To reduce a solid substance to a state of fine division.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]

powder

(pou′dər)
n.
1. A substance consisting of ground, pulverized, or otherwise finely dispersed solid particles.
2. Any of various preparations in the form of powder, as certain cosmetics and medicines.

pow′der·er n.

powder

the dried product of an extraction process in which a substance is first mixed with a solvent such as alcohol or water. Then, the solvent is removed completely. The dry solid that remains either is already in powder form or may be ground into it.

powder

Chinese medicine
A general term for ground herbs and formulas used in Chinese herbal medicine to prepare in capsules, infusions, liquors, porridges, ointments, pastes and pills; powders are less concentrated than decoctions, gentler, are best suited for chronic conditions.

powder

Drug slang A pulverized abuse substance–eg, heroin, amphetamine, cocaine Vox populi A pulverized material. See Antler velvet powder, Dover's powder, Fluticasone propionate inhalation powder, Inheritance powder, James Fever powder, Talcum powder.

pow·der

(pow'dĕr)
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. pharmaceutics A homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry particulate matter consisting of one or more substances.
3. A single dose of a powdered drug, enclosed in an envelope of folded paper.
4. To reduce a solid substance to a state of very fine division.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]

powder,

n in homeopathy, a dosage form, often lactose, that has had a small amount of homeopathic remedy poured on it. This powder can then be consumed by the patient.

pow·der

(pow'dĕr)
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. In pharmaceutics, a homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry, particulate matter consisting of one or more substances.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]

powder

an aggregation of particles obtained by grinding or triturating a solid.

dusting powder
a fine powder used as a talc substitute.
glove powder
sterile and special grind for powdering surgical gloves.
References in periodicals archive ?
The action itself, however, was deemed sound enough to deal with the Cordite ammo, and while it went through some modifications, it remained pretty much the same throughout the service life of the Enfield.
Bar for the cordite, everything involved in the production was manufactured in Birmingham.
Not seen on the track until September, there was a fair bit to like about the King's Best colt's fourth to Cordite at Leicester in October, with that horse showing the form in a really good light when occupying the same position behind the ill-fated Piping Rock in the Horris Hill at Newbury.
Wake up and smell the cordite before it's too late, Morpeth
Our main work down the pits was described as "canch" work, this was when our deputy would blast a certain amount of stone and when the cordite and smoke disappeared we would go in and clear it away so that the coal cutter machine could get at the seam of coal.
As a new recruit to the nightshift, huge boxes of cordite - the propellant that replaced gunpowder - was mixed by hand in virtual darkness.
375's long case was needed to hold enough Cordite to push a 300-grain bullet fast enough to stop lions and tigers.
After working as a maid, I worked in Marchwiel making cordite explosives for Naval guns.
The new technology developed by Birmingham University researchers will allow the players to sniff out cordite, diesel fumes, and burning rubber.
Surely Captain Livingston is aware that none of those worthies ever sniffed cordite or heard an angry shot crackle past.
Consequently, the sound of flak, the smell of cordite, the assault of enemy fighters, and the plunge from a burning aircraft are very much part of the story.
YOU could smell the first whiff of cordite on Tuesday morning when the JP McManus mob fired their opening salvo.