cordiform


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cordiform

 [kor´dĭ-form]
heart-shaped.

cor·di·form

(kōr'di-fōrm),
Heart-shaped.
[L. cor (cord-), heart, + forma, shape]

cordiform

[kor′di-form]
heart-shaped.

cor·di·form

(kōr'di-fōrm)
Heart-shaped.
[L. cor (cord-), heart, + forma, shape]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in the present conditions of maturation, the percentage of embryos developing to cordiform and torpedo ontogenetic stages was low and no embryo at cotyledonary phase was seen, revealing an asynchronous development, once globular somatic embryos were formed (Table 3).
The transition from globular to cordiform stage was marked by cellular elongation and cotyledon early growth (Fig.
1]) Globular Cordiform Torpedo Cotiledonary Hydrolyzed casein 61.
7 cm, lanceolate to lanceolate-oblong, basically truncate to cordiform, apically acute; interporangial scales ca.
0 cm, ovate, papiraceous, basically cordiform, apically acute to acuminate; abaxial blade scales 0.
To summarise the problem, the name cordiform came to be applied late in the nineteenth century to a large group of mathematically related maps (Fig.
At this point it is worth remembering that the cordiform maps were invented and published before the heart's function was well seen, described or understood.
or to declare his double cordiform map "twin figures of the human heart".
1) Fine's earlier double cordiform world map of 1531 does not show Magellan's South Pacific islands.
FINE, OrONCE, (1531), Nova, et integra universi orbis descriptio [map], Reproduction of Oronce Fine's double cordiform world map of 1531.
1534-1536), Recens et integra orbis description [map], Reproduction of Oronce Fine's cordiform world map of 1534-1536, original in the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris.
32) For example, see Oronce Fine's double cordiform map of 1531, a version of which is in the British Library, London.