coracoid

(redirected from coracoids)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

coracoid

 [kor´ah-koid]
like a crow's beak. 2. the coracoid process, a projection from the upper part of the neck of the scapula, overhanging the shoulder joint.

cor·a·coid

(kōr'ă-koyd),
Shaped like a crow's beak; denoting a process of the scapula.
[G. korakōdēs, like a crow's beak, fr. korax, raven, + eidos, appearance]

coracoid

/cor·a·coid/ (kor´ah-koid)
1. like a crow's beak.

coracoid

(kôr′ə-koid′, kŏr′-)
n.
1. A bony process projecting from the scapula toward the sternum in mammals.
2. A beak-shaped bone articulating with the scapula and sternum in many other vertebrates, such as birds and reptiles.
adj.
Of, relating to, or resembling a coracoid.

cor·a·coid

(kōr'ă-koyd)
Shaped like a crow's beak; denoting a process of the scapula.
[G. korakōdēs, like a crow's beak, fr. korax, raven, + eidos, appearance]

coracoid

A bony process on the outer side of the shoulder-blade (scapula) which projects forward under the outer end of the collar-bone (clavicle).

coracoid

one of a pair of bones that form the ventral part of the pectoral girdle of many vertebrates. In most mammals they are reduced to small processes on the SCAPULA and their role taken over by the CLAVICLES.

coracoid

1. like a crow's beak.
2. the stout bone of the avian shoulder that is braced against the sternum.
3. the coracoid process, a projection from the rim of the glenoid of the scapula.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, the coracoid position data relative to the glenoid and greater tuberosity may be useful for assessing medial glenoid wear.
Table 1 Comparison of Average Glenohumeral Joint Scapular Plane Measurements: Female Versus Male All Anatomic Parameter Shoulders (mm unless noted) Dimension 1: Base of Coracoid 56.
Much debate surrounds the management strategies for coracoid injuries in birds, with some authors advocating surgical correction (5-8) and others recommending conservative treatment.
Inclusion criteria were birds with unilateral coracoid trauma and a known final outcome.
For birds treated conservatively for coracoid injuries, general anesthesia was induced by facemask with 5% isoflurane at the time of initial examination, and the injury was confirmed by radiography (Fig 1).
The surgical technique for repair of coracoid injuries in birds has been well described and is generally recommended for birds >300 g in body weight.
Body size has been suggested (5) to be an inaccurate predictor of the success of conservative treatment for coracoid injuries in birds, whereas aspect ratio and wing loading have been suggested (5) as better indicators.
Surgical correction of coracoid injuries can be difficult because patients are often further compromised by substantial soft tissue injuries, (3) which may increase the anesthetic risk.
Given the propensity of coracoid injuries in birds to be accompanied by other traumatic injuries and the risks that those injuries pose to prolonged general anesthesia, recommending that coracoid injuries be managed conservatively would seem prudent.
A distal coracoid was identified by Alden Miller (1931) as Sayornis sp.
This species is represented by two mandibles and a coracoid in the SBMNH collections (No.
A mandible, humerus, carpometacarpus and coracoid, although nearly identical in configuration to T.