coracoacromial

cor·a·co·a·cro·mi·al

(kōr'ă-kō-ă-krō'mē-ăl),
Relating to the coracoid and acromial processes.
Synonym(s): acromiocoracoid

coracoacromial

[kôr′əkō·əkrō′mē·əl]
pertaining to the coracoid process and the acromion of the scapula.

cor·a·co·a·cro·mi·al

(kōr'ă-kō-ă-krō'mē-ăl)
Relating to the coracoid and acromial processes.
Synonym(s): acromiocoracoid.

coracoacromial

(kor″ă-kō-ă-krō′mē-ăl) [Gr. korax, raven, + akron, point, + omos, shoulder]
Pert. to the acromial and coracoid processes of the scapula.
References in periodicals archive ?
The coracoacromial (CA) ligament is then completely released to allow additional visualization of the rotator interval window.
Subacromial impingement involves compression or mechanical irritation of the subacromial bursa, supraspinatus tendon, infraspinatus tendon, and/or long head of the biceps tendon between the coracoacromial arch and the humeral head (Figure 2(a)) [22] and is purported to occur at lower humeral elevation angles.
Rotator cuff muscles traverse a narrow space between the acromion and coracoacromial, ligament above and the humeral head below.
The main mechanism is subacromial impingement of rotator cuff tendons (mainly supraspinatus), long head of biceps tendon and subacromial bursa between the humeral head and coracoacromial arch caused by repetitive overhead activities of the arm.
1996) Nontraumatic glenohumeral instability and coracoacromial impingement in swimmers.
With flexion or abduction of the shoulder, the tendon passes most closely beneath the tip of the acromium or the coracoacromial ligament, especially when the shoulder is abducted to 80[degrees].
The coracoacromial ligament (CAL): the CAL can be felt on most subjects as a firm, unforgiving structure between the coracoid and the anterior tip of the acromion, often with an obvious fibrous edge.
3) Similarly, use of a hemiarthroplasty in this scenario is at risk for developing anterosuperior subluxation in patients with previous acromioplasty and incompetent coracoacromial arch.
Bone block transfer of coracoacromial ligament in acromioclavicular injury.
The coracoclavicular and coracoacromial ligaments, as well as the coracobrachialis, short head of the biceps, and pectoralis minor have all been implicated in coracoid avulsion fractures through indirect mechanisms.
Patients with subacromial impingement were managed by a subacromial decompression, with partial resection of the coracoacromial ligament.