DRM

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DRM

Abbrev. for Diploma in Radiation Medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, copyright industries have an important presence in developing countries.
The China Audio & Video Copyright Association is the only association of its kind approved by the State Copyright Administration.
They denied most of the allegations but assured us in writing that they would take steps to prevent any copyright violations in the future.
While teaching your students about copyright may seem a formidable challenge, there are several helpful Web sites designed to assist in the task, including Copyright Kids (www.
In recognition of the fact that culture is a shared enterprise, those creators who have chosen to make their works available under the alternative licenses sponsored by the nonprofit public domain advocate Creative Commons are modelling a system in which copyright owners may choose not to claim all of their exclusive rights "as specified in the Copyright Act.
In the case of a written, dramatic, musical or artistic work, the general rule is that the person who created the work is the first owner of the economic rights under copyright.
If their logic were followed, all copyright laws would be "utterly nullified" While they had every right to deliver whatever message they desired, they had no right "to use Mickey Mouse as the vehicle.
And for those who make money buying and selling information--Jack Valenti, the retiring head of the Motion Picture Association of America, calls it "the copyright industry"--this infant technology looked like the apocalypse.
Those who work with and/or study copyright are well aware of the vagueness within the law.
USCo acquires no copyright rights to reproduce or prepare derivative programs or publicly perform or display the software.
We have always maintained and the law has long recognized that the copyright, whose aim is to provide incentive for the creation and preservation of creative works, is in the public interest,'' said Jack Valenti, president of the Motion Picture Association of America and Hollywood's lead Washington lobbyist.
The "mail myth" evolved in the days before the 1989 amendment to the Copyright Act, when the United States joined the Berne Convention.