DRM

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DRM

Abbrev. for Diploma in Radiation Medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The CASE Act's jurisdiction would be limited to civil claims of copyright infringement of $30,000 in damages or less, and the board would be authorized to hear claims of abusive takedown notifications under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).
Much of the bill reflects "Copyright Small Claims," a September 2013 report from the Register of Copyrights.
A copyright is considered active as soon as you can A prove it's being used in the business world.
As a result, debates about copyright policies should focus not so much on the desirability of strict or lax copyright protection, but on the appropriate design of copyright systems.
Indiana University Purdue, Copyright Management Center: (Full text is available at: http://www.
What Subject Matter is Eligible for Copyright Protection?
Despite multiple prominent copyright notices and repeated specific warnings, and despite previous assurances denying infringement and assuring IMF that steps had been taken to confirm no infringement was taking place, Credit Suisse made multiple copies [of the newsletters in question] on a regular basis [and] over a substantial period of time," the complaint reads.
Copyright has been a hot topic on the Internet for years and, consequently, there is a plethora of Web sites containing reliable and useful information about copyright matters, many written specifically for teachers and students.
Written by copyright specialists from academia, copyright administration, and private practice, this book is billed by editors Ganea (Max Planck Institute for Patent, Copyright and Competition Law, Germany), Heath (Max Planck Institute for Patent, Copyright and Competition Law), and Saito (president, Copyright Association of Japan) as the first comprehensive introduction to Japanese copyright law in the English language.
So far as it purports to address copyright, however, this statement is unlikely to communicate much to general readers--most of whom haven't studied the Copyright Act--other than the warning that taking pictures is a riskier business than one may have realized.
But copyright gives the creator or first owner of any original work the legal right to control how that work may be used ( rewarding creators for their efforts and encouraging future creativity.
Over the last few decades, copyright has evolved in dramatic and