copulative


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copulative

(kŏp′yə-lā′tĭv, -lə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Grammar
a. Serving to connect coordinate words or clauses: a copulative conjunction.
b. Serving as a copula: a copulative verb.
2. Of or relating to copulation.
n. Grammar
A copulative word or group of words.

cop′u·la′tive·ly adv.
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References in periodicals archive ?
La notion de copule etant ainsi definie, nous avons choisi comme centre structural de la phrase copulative ser / estar (etre), car ce sont ces deux verbes qui expriment le plus normalement l'etat en espagnol.
Baby Boomers were the product of increased copulative opportunities afforded by the end of the Second World War, and the Duck and Covers, having unleashed the power of the atom bomb, lived in guilty fear that another power--namely the Russians--might return the compliment.
What he emphasises is his dutiful, asexual womanliness which he defends against copulative sexual desire.
The classes 01-15 and the locative classes 16-18 (LOC) are all assigned at the first level of annotation, except the so-called copulative subject concords, which actially function as full copulative and verbs are tagged as such, the question words (QUE), see below.
The intention of the repetition, in the form of the book title Spruche and Widerspruche, may be to hint at sublimation, but, ironically, the copulative form of this very title presents an unresolved dualism, an open-ended series, 'contradictions' that are not so much synthesized as offered alongside the 'sayings', as anti-sayings that appear to have proliferated from the personal 'contradiction'.
Preservationists, and particularly Catholics, believe that penile-vaginal intercourse is the only appropriate form of intercourse, in part because of the "divinity" of the copulative sexual act, (445) and in part because they believe that male and female genitalia are physiologically "complementary.
Since "to be" is a copulative verb, isn't "whosoever," or better, "whoever," called for?
Whereas in earlier centuries prostitutes of the Aretine sort presented themselves as experts in copulative technique, Aimee speaks firstly of desire and loss of control: "La bete gronde, elle hurle.
It is only with the next stanza that Donne offers a positive assertion of the relationship between "Discretion" and "Religion": "these are one" The violence of this typical Donnean copulative is underscored by the etymology of his terms: "Discretion" derives from the Latin discernere, "to separate out" and "Religion" (in one etymology hazarded by Cicero [De dorno, 105]) from the Latin religare, "to bind or fasten together.
While likely a side effect of the film censorship that dominated the 1950s, this curious placement also suggests that art is more fertile than reality, and that for this film the creative process between playwright and actress is more life giving than the copulative process between husband and wife.
The copulative use of the verb "to be," as we know it and use it, was unknown to the Homeric Greeks and only felt amiss after the need to express permanent relations arose.