coping resources

coping resources

the characteristics of a person, group, or environment that are helpful in assisting individuals in adapting to stress.
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The main objective of this study was to investigate how ATCOs cope with stress using coping resources, and also to explore whether there are any significant differences in the coping resources of ATCOs of different demographic sub-groups.
The first part theorizes on the ripple effects of trauma, coping resources, the role of intimate partners of directly traumatized individuals, the stressors of ordinary aging and chronic illness, and intergenerational effects.
These groupings were then examined for differences in teachers' personal coping resources, job satisfaction, and occupational commitment.
The perception depends not only on the strength of the demands but also on the individual's cognitive appraisal of the situation and of the coping resources available.
Life stressors and coping resources influence health and well being.
While positive events, such as getting a new job or buying a home, can generate stress, it is more often the negative events in your life that put prolonged, excessive demands on your coping resources and cause you to feel lasting stress.
Families that are dealing with chronic illnesses with an acute onset, have a compressed time frame to develop coping resources, requiring more mobilization of crisis management skills.
Brown and Cross's (1997) finding that despite having fewer coping resources, women's academic achievement was not affected.
Aldwin, Sutton, and Lachman (1996) studied whether stressful episodes provide content for the development of coping resources and found that 81.
Collectively, these factors may interact synergistically to overwhelm coping resources.
This treatment-seeking disparity is often explained through an emphasis on African Americans' attitudes toward mental health service, coping resources in the African American community, and forms of racial bias in mental health care (Breland-Noble, Bell, & Nicolas, 2006; Snowden, 2003).
This study focused on responses to sibling cancer and its aftermath, with particular scrutiny directed toward stress factors, duress responses, and coping resources.