copepod


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co·pe·pod

(kō'pē-pod),
Any member of the order Copepoda.

copepod

any minute free-living or parasitic crustacean of the subclass Copepoda. Copepods lack a carapace and are extremely common in both freshwater and marine plankton, where they constitute an important food source for larger animals such as fish.

copepod

a member of the subclass Copepoda of marine invertebrate parasites. There are more than 4500 species. Includes Cyclops spp. intermediate host for Spirometra erinacei, Diphyllobothrium latum.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the outset, copepods from different locations showed wide variability in heat tolerance.
In their analysis of the Mexican freshwater copepod fauna, Suarez-Morales and Reid (1998) noted that states and subregions with arid climates may reveal a surprising diversity and provide models for studying dispersal mechanisms and island biogeography.
The total body length of adult copepods was measured from the beginning of the cephalothorax to the end of the caudal rami, without taking into account the caudal setae.
another copepod is nudging close, a clutch of shrink-wrapped eggs
34) determined that copepods were deposited in small depressions in a similar manner to passive particles and could not select areas in environments with moving water.
Unlike the copepod trends, the rotifer trends closely resembled the total zooplankton treatment trends.
The winter plankton include fewer bacteria and cyanobacteria, and the grazers are largely represented by crustaceans (especially the copepod Diaptomus: Pace and Orcutt, 1981).
Copepod abundance peaked between March and April, but abundances rarely exceeded 30 individuals [L.
Of the large species, microcrustaceans called `cladocerans' and `copepods' (see boxed story) were well represented, particularly the huge four millimetre `calanoid' copepod, Boeckella major.