convex

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convex

 [kon´veks]
having a rounded, somewhat elevated surface.

con·vex

(kon'veks, kŏn-veks'),
Applied to a surface that is evenly curved outward, the segment of a sphere.
[L. convexus, vaulted, arched, convex, fr. con-veho, to bring together]

convex

/con·vex/ (kon´veks) having a rounded, somewhat elevated surface.convex´ity

convex

Etymology: L, convextus, vaulted
having a surface that curves outward. Compare concave.

con·vex

(kon-veks')
Applied to a surface that is evenly curved outward, as the segment of a sphere.
[L. convexus, vaulted, arched, convex, fr. con-veho, to bring together]

convex

a surface that curves evenly outward

convex 

Having a surface curved like the exterior of a sphere. See converging lens; convex mirror.

con·vex

(kon'veks)
Denotes surface evenly curved outward, segment of a sphere.
[L. convexus, vaulted, arched, convex, fr. con-veho, to bring together]

convex (konveks´),

adj having a surface that curves outward.

convex

having a rounded, somewhat elevated surface.

convex face
convex sole
see dropped sole.
References in periodicals archive ?
The PPHMDSO film on the porous PSf support is under compressive internal stresses, causing the membrane to convexly bend with respect to the film.
Aedeagal shaft with short curved processes at apex; subgenital plate convexly rounded .
Medium sized shells with low spire; strong angulation on outer edge of flattened upper whorl surface; outer whorl surface slightly concave below angulation then curving convexly onto base of whorl to angulation near midline of base of whorl: surface convex from angulation into open umbilicus; ultimate whorl subpentagonal in cross section; growth lines slightly prosocline on upper whorl surface, curving convexly forward on lateral surface before curving backwards on basal surface into umbilicus.
The absorbent core is subjected to lateral compressive forces and the first and second portions preferentially bend convexly upwardly toward the cover, at the first flexure axis.
One-half the risk is r etained in a two-member pool, one-third in a three-member pool, and so on, suggesting additional risk-sharing benefits decline convexly in pool size.