convergent evolution


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

evolution

 [ev″o-lu´shun]
the process of development in which an organ or organism becomes more and more complex by the differentiation of its parts; a continuous and progressive change according to certain laws and by means of resident forces.
convergent evolution the development, in animals that are only distantly related, of similar structures or functions in adaptation to similar environments.

con·ver·gent ev·o·lu·tion

the evolutionary development of similar structures in two or more species, often widely separated phylogenetically, in response to similarities of environment; for example, the wing-like structures in insects, birds, and flying mammals.

convergent evolution

convergent evolution

the evolution of nonhomologous organs in distantly related species in response to similar environmental conditions. Although of different origin, the organs appear similar in function, shape, or form.

con·ver·gent ev·o·lu·tion

(kŏn-vĕr'jĕnt ev'ŏ-lū'shŭn)
The evolutionary development of similar structures in two or more species, often widely separated phylogenetically, in response to similarities of environment; for example, the wings in insects, birds, and flying mammals.

convergent evolution

1. The process in which phylogenetically distinct lineages acquire similar characteristics.
2. Evolutionary changes in which descendants resemble each other more closely than their progenitors did.

convergence

or

convergent evolution

or

parallelism

a form of evolution which results in unrelated organisms independently producing similarities of form, usually because they become adapted to living in similar types of environment. For example, fish and cetaceans have evolved similar streamlined body shapes and fins.

evolution

the process of development in which an organ or organism becomes more and more complex by the differentiation of its parts; a continuous and progressive change according to certain laws and by means of resident forces.

convergent evolution
the development, in animals that are only distantly related, of similar structures or functions in adaptation to similar environment.
divergent evolution
the development of different characteristics in animals that were closely related in response to being placed in different environments.
References in periodicals archive ?
So, we used the mutually exclusive AA substitutions as candidates of convergent evolution for our research purposes.
Strains that cluster by one typing method must be analyzed by other methods to ensure that the groupings represent clusters of true relatedness and not cases of convergent evolution.
This process, called convergent evolution, is apparent in dolphins and sharks--one's a mammal, the other's a fish.
Paul Labute said, "PSILO can search for and score similar binding pockets in dissimilar proteins, allowing organizations to identify cases of convergent evolution and off-target binding, recognizing potential side effects or new possible therapeutic areas.
It will further examine whether local adaptation occurs by convergent evolution of molecular systems in plants.
These particular mammals evolved bipedal locomotion and anteriorly positioned foramina magna independently, or as a result of convergent evolution, says Gabrielle Russo, who is a postdoctoral research fellow at Northeast Ohio Medical University and lead researcher of the study.
05 ( ANI ): Scientists have found that there are certain genetic similarities between bats and dolphins and that the evolution of similar traits in different species, a process known as convergent evolution, is widespread not only at the physical level, but also at the genetic level.
The discussions of different Orders of birds include this perspective except for the section on passerines, which does not mention molecular evidence of convergent evolution of distantly related passerine lineages in Australia and on other continents.
The finding, adds Madsen, is "a beautiful example of what's called convergent evolution, where animals find the same solution to the same problem, but from different starting points.
Objective: The ComPAg research program will produce the first global comparative synthesis of the convergent evolution of domesticated plants and early agricultural systems based primarily on empirical archaeobotanical data.