convection

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current

 [kur´ent]
1. something that flows.
2. specifically, electricity transmitted through a circuit.
alternating current a current that periodically flows in opposite directions; its amplitude fluctuates as a sine wave.
convection current a current caused by movement by convection of warmer fluid into an area of cooler fluid.
direct current a current that flows in one direction only; when modeled as a wave, its amplitude is constant. When used medically it is called galvanic current. This current has distinct and important polarity and marked secondary chemical effects.
galvanic current a steady direct current.
current of injury an electric current that flows between injured myocardium and normal myocardium, because such cells have a reduced membrane potential; it may be either diastolic or systolic.
current of injury, diastolic the current that flows from injured to noninjured tissue during electrical diastole.
current of injury, systolic the current that flows from healthy tissue to injured tissue during electrical systole.
inwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the interior of a cell.
leakage current the electrical current that exists in the parts or metal case of electrical equipment.
outwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the exterior of a cell.
potassium rectifying c's transmembrane currents that rectify inwardly or outwardly to make adjustments in cellular functions; they are mainly responsible for the repolarization phase of the action potential. There are at least six mechanisms by which potassium ions move across cardiac cell membranes in the role of rectifier.

con·vec·tion

(kon-vek'shŭn),
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]

convection

/con·vec·tion/ (kon-vek´shun) the act of conveying or transmission, specifically transmission of heat in a liquid or gas by bulk movement of heated particles to a cooler area.convec´tive

convection

[kənvek′shən]
Etymology: L, convehere, to bring together
(in physics) the transfer of heat through a gas or liquid by the circulation of heated particles.

con·vec·tion

(kŏn-vek'shŭn)
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]

convection

the propagation of heat through liquids and gases by the movement of the heated particles, increasing their kinetic energy.

convection

the act of conveying or transmission; specifically, transmission of heat in a liquid or gas by circulation of heated particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Were they born when the Earth was born, somehow escaping mixing in the constantly convecting mantle?
In addition, at the plastic surface the heat flux is divided between heating and melting the powder that is in contact with the surface, and convecting heat to the remaining bulk powder.
Naturally convecting hot water below the surface will be utilized by power projects, , but most geothermal energy is stored in impermeable hot rocks, so the Newberry project is intended to exploit such rocks by fracturing them with pressurized water to increase their permeability enough to support geothermal operations.
It's not clear why the inner core should be convecting.
In winter data the seasonally exposed mode waters form a smoothly varying ring of progressively colder and more deeply convecting waters (see [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] at left).
Therefore, several different schemes to deal with the initial orientation state were introduced in the present study: i) by convecting the orientation state at each layer from the neighboring element (i.
Another group, call them the splitters, argues that the upper and lower mantle remain separate, each convecting on its own like the stacked pots of a double boiler.
Thus our picture can be thought of as a snapshot of the temperature pattern in Earth's convecting mantle.