radiography

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Related to contrast radiography: contrast material

radiography

 [ra″de-og´rah-fe]
the making of film records (radiographs) of internal structures of the body by exposure of film specially sensitized to x-rays or gamma rays. adj., adj radiograph´ic.
body section radiography tomography.
double-contrast radiography mucosal relief radiography.
electron radiography radiography consisting of electronic images that can be computer enhanced, electronically reversed, stored, retrieved, transmitted, and/or printed on photographic film.
mass radiography examination by x-rays of the general population or of large groups of the population.
mucosal relief radiography a technique for revealing any abnormality of the intestinal mucosa, involving injection and evacuation of a barium enema, followed by inflation of the intestine with air under light pressure. The light coating of barium on the inflated intestine in the radiograph reveals clearly even small abnormalities; double-contrast r.
neutron radiography that in which a narrow beam of neutrons from a nuclear reactor is passed through tissues; especially useful in visualizing bony tissue.
panoramic radiography pantomography.
serial radiography the making of several exposures of a particular area at arbitrary intervals.
spot-film radiography the making of localized instantaneous radiographic exposures; see also spot film.

ra·di·og·ra·phy

(rā'dē-og'ră-fē),
Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of x-rays with the record of the findings usually exposed onto photographic film.
Synonym(s): roentgenography

radiography

/ra·di·og·ra·phy/ (ra″de-og´rah-fe) the making of film records (radiographs) of internal structures of the body by passing x-rays or gamma rays through the body to act on specially sensitized film.radiograph´ic
body section radiography  tomography.
digital radiography  a technique in which x-ray absorption is quantified by assignment of a number to the amount of x-rays reaching the detector; the information is manipulated by a computer to produce an optimal image.
electron radiography  a technique in which a latent electron image is produced on clear plastic by passing x-ray photons through a gas with a high atomic number; this image is then developed into a black-and-white picture.
mucosal relief radiography  radiography of the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract in a double-contrast examination.
neutron radiography  that in which a narrow beam of neutrons from a nuclear reactor is passed through tissues, especially useful in visualizing bony tissues.
serial radiography  the making of several exposures of a particular area at arbitrary intervals.
spot-film radiography  the making of localized instantaneous radiographic exposures during fluoroscopy.

radiography

(rā′dē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n.
The process by which radiographs are made. Also called skiagraphy.

radiography

[rā′dē·og′rəfē]
Etymology: L, radius + Gk, graphein, to record
the production of shadow images on photographic emulsion through the action of ionizing radiation. The image is the result of the differential attenuation of the radiation in its passage through the object being radiographed. radiographic, adj.

radiography

Roentgenography, radiographic imaging Imaging The recording of an image of a region placed in a beam of radiation. See Angiography, Cholangiography, CT imaging, Fluoroscopy, GI series, IVP, Mammography, MRI, Venography, Xeroradiography.

ra·di·og·ra·phy

(rā'dē-og'ră-fē)
Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of x-rays with the record of the findings usually impressed on a photographic film.

radiography

The use of X-radiation to produce images that can help in diagnosis. Radiography includes the use of CT SCANNING, which is an X-ray technique,RADIONUCLIDE SCANNING and, by courtesy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compare RADIOLOGY.

Radiography

Examination of any part of the body through the use of x rays. The process produces an image of shadows and contrasts on film.
Mentioned in: X Rays of the Orbit

radiography

the use of electromagnetic radiation to create images of the body from which medical diagnoses can be made. Initially referred to 'plain' X-ray films but the general term has expanded to include other forms of diagnostic imaging such as ultrasound, CT and MRI scanning. Used in sports medicine to provide images of bone, soft tissue and internal organs to aid diagnosis and monitor the effects of treatment, e.g. the healing of a fracture or muscle tear. See also X-rays.

ra·di·og·ra·phy

(rā'dē-og'ră-fē)
Examination of any body part for diagnostic purposes with x-rays with the record of the findings exposed onto photographic film.

radiography (rā´dēog´rəfē),

n the making of shadow images on photographic emulsion by the action of ionizing radiation. The image is the result of the differential attenuation of the radiation in its passage through the object being radiographed.
Roentgenography refers to production of film by the use of roentgen rays only.
radiography, bone in,
n radiography of bone and marrow tissue. Translucencies and opacities in bone in radiographs depend on the different densities that bone and marrow spaces present to the roentgen rays. The configuration of bone tissue represents the topography and arrangement of bone trabeculae, which register as opaque in contrast to the translucency of the marrow spaces.
radiography, computerized digital,
n a radiography machine using computer technology to produce a digital image instead of using film; a digital sensor is placed in a disposable sheath inside the patient's oral cavity; then the sensor is exposed to radiation as in a traditional radiograph, except that the sensor produces an immediately accessible digital image that can be viewed on a computer screen.
radiography, digital subtraction,
n a technique for eliminating unnecessary anatomic structures on a radiographic image by storing the pre- and postprocedure images in a computer and then combining them together digitally to display the final subtracted image, which emphasizes the differences between the two original films.
radiography, oral,
n the specialized operative and technical procedures and practices for making successful radiographic surveys, with the understanding that it involves the selection of the dental radiography unit and its adjustments as well as the generation and application of roentgen rays to all phases of interest to the dental profession. It also takes into consideration all the processes necessary for the production of finished radiographs of the teeth and their supporting tissues, adjacent regions, and associated parts. See also radiograph(s).
radiography, subtraction,
n the digital or photographic manipulation of a radiograph in which background images are eliminated to highlight areas for pre- and postoperative comparison.

radiography

the making of film records (radiographs) of internal structures of the body by exposure of film specially sensitized to x-rays or gamma rays.

body-section radiography
a special technique to show in detail images and structures lying in a predetermined plane of tissue, while blurring or eliminating detail in images in other planes; various mechanisms and methods for such radiography have been given various names, e.g. laminagraphy, tomography, etc.
contrast radiography
the use of means of exaggerating the differences in density of tissues or organs or intraluminal filling defects, usually by the introduction of contrast agents.
double contrast radiography
see double contrast.
intraoral radiography
small non-screen film is placed in the mouth and x-rays are directed from outside the mouth. Used to assess alveolar bone and roots of teeth.
mucosal relief radiography
a technique for revealing any abnormality of the intestinal mucosa, involving injection and evacuation of a barium enema, followed by inflation of the intestine with air under light pressure. The light coating of barium on the inflated intestine in the radiograph reveals clearly even small abnormalities.
neutron radiography
that in which a narrow beam of neutrons from a nuclear reactor is passed through tissues; especially useful in visualizing bony tissue.
scout radiography
see survey radiograph, straight (2).
serial radiography
the making of several exposures of a particular area at arbitrary intervals.
spot-film radiography
the making of localized instantaneous radiographic exposures during fluoroscopy.
stress radiography
positioning to intentionally place stress on structures being radiographed; most commonly used in the diagnosis of spinal disorders such as atlantoaxial instability, wobbler syndrome and lumbosacral instability.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contrast radiography of the soft tissues was performed according to the technique developed at the Russian Ilizarov Scientific Centre for Restorative Traumatology and Orthopaedics: injection into a muscle or the subcutaneous fat of the water-soluable non-ionic contrast substance Omnipaque (Nicomed) or Ultravist (Schering).
Contrast radiography and US studies of the patients with achondroplasia showed age-dependent and typological peculiarities in the muscle structure of the lower leg.
Along with peculiar features in the structure of the tibial muscles in the patients with achondroplasia revealed by US examination, there were considerable anatomical differences that were well visualized with contrast radiography, as it was possible to determine the length of the muscle belly, its thickness, and some structural features.