contralateral hemiplegia

con·tra·lat·er·al hem·i·ple·gi·a

characteristic presentation of a lesion of the descending motor pathways proximal to the decussation, in which the resulting limb weakness is on the side opposite to the brain lesion.

con·tra·lat·er·al hem·i·ple·gi·a

(kon'tră-lat'ĕr-ăl hem'ē-plē'jē-ă)
Paralysis occurring on the side opposite to the causal central lesion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contralateral hemiplegia following HZO has pathogenesis similar to that of HZCR.
6) It is also important to note the possibility of severe neurological complications, such as encephalitis and prolonged contralateral hemiplegia.
In 1906, Spanish otorhinolaryngologist Antonio Garcia Tapia became the first to describe a lesion of the vagus and hypoglossal nerves with contralateral hemiplegia.
4] Occlusion of the superior trunk of the middle cerebral artery will result in the following symptoms: contralateral hemiplegia and hemianesthesia in the face and arm with lesser involvement of the lower extremity, ipsilateral deviation of eyes and head, and Broca's aphasia (with dominant hemisphere occlusion).
12] When the posterior cerebral artery is occluded, the clinical symptoms include contralateral hemiplegia, sensory loss and ipsilateral visual field deficits.
8,17] Occlusion of the anterior choroidal artery results in contralateral hemiplegia, hemihypesthesia and homonymous hemianopia.
For example, a patient with an upper limb fracture and contralateral hemiplegia may be virtually immobilized for several weeks owing to inability to use a walking aid.