contractor


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contractor

(kŏn′trăk′tər, kən-trăk′-)
n.
1. One that agrees to furnish materials or perform services at a specified price, especially for construction work.
2. Something, especially a muscle, that contracts.

contractor

A UK term for a member of staff or external worker who provides NHS services, but is not directly employed by an NHS Trust.

contractor

the role adopted by a veterinarian who employs others, especially technicians, to carry out specific tasks, e.g. mulesing of sheep, without being financially liable for the quality of their work.
References in periodicals archive ?
The coming Congress may prove the most challenging in recent memory for federal contractors.
The proposed rule replaces this exception with one that applies when the administrative contracting officer determines that electronic submission would be unduly burdensome to the contractor.
If you don't have a drawing that clearly shows what you intended, the contractor will see this as a change in scope and whether you think that it's a big deal or not, it will likely bring a change in the cost.
USAID employees and USAID-financed contractors are granted income tax and limited customs, value-added and property tax immunities through USAID Bilateral Agreements; see USAID ADS 155, paragraph 155.
Recognizing what hazards may exist before a contractor steps onto the site is what factored into the creation of last year's online fall arrest protection course and the just recently launched Internet version of Confined Space Awareness.
The owner of a hair salon, for example, may use a contractor to create marketing brochures and advertising materials for her business, while a financial planner may hire one to handle 10 hours of filing a week.
The sub's liability policies should include your client, the general contractor and the project's owner as additional insureds along with any other entities for which your insured is required to provide additional insured status, such as an architect, engineer or a municipality.
Moreover, homeowners have little recourse if the work is not performed properly except to sue the unlicensed contractor civilly and hope that they can locate some assets.
A client may be interviewed and assessed by more than one contractor and if unsuccessful with the program may be interviewed and assessed by other program providers.
When it comes to the administration of service contracts, proper oversight is even more critical because in these contracts there is often no end product that can be pointed to as the result of the expenditure of tax dollars; rather, there is supposed to be monitoring and surveillance of the contractor to ensure they are providing the services contracted for in accordance with the terms of the agreement.
Thanks to their ability to handle a variety of primary demolition tasks with a simple change of their jaws, multi-processors can offer value, as well as versatility, to a demolition contractor.
For once-weekly maintenance, expect to pay $60 to $80 a month for basic mow-blow-and-go service, or $85 to $125 for the services of a licensed contractor.