contract

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con·tract

(kon-trakt'),
1. To shorten; to become reduced in size; in the case of muscle, either to shorten or to undergo an increase in tension.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. An explicit bilateral commitment by psychotherapist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of the psychotherapy.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]

contract

/con·tract/ (kon-trakt´)
1. to shorten, or reduce in size, as a muscle.
2. to acquire or incur.

contract

(kən-trăkt′, kŏn′trăkt′)
v.
1. To reduce in size by drawing together; shrink.
2. To become reduced in size by or as if by being drawn together, as the pupil of the eye.
3. To acquire or incur by contagion or infection.

contract

Etymology: L, con + trahere, to draw
1 n, [kon′trakt] , an agreement or a promise that meets certain legal requirements, including competence of both or all parties to make the contract, proper lawful subject matter, mutuality of agreement, mutuality of obligation, and consideration (the exchange of something of value in payment for the obligation undertaken).
2 v, [kəntrakt′] , to make such an agreement or promise. contractual, adj.

contract

A written, dated and signed agreement between two or more parties, which sets out any arrangements on delegation and distribution of tasks and obligations, and, if appropriate, on financial matters. A clinical trial protocol may serve as the basis for a contract.

contract

Managed care A health care policy or plan in which a provider offers certain services delineated in writing, to which the purchaser–Pt agrees by signature. See Guaranteed renewable contract, Provider risk contract, Subscriber contract.

con·tract

(kon'trakt, kŏn-trakt')
1. To shorten; to become reduced in size; in the case of muscle, either to shorten or to undergo an increase in tension.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. An explicit bilateral commitment by psychotherapist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of the psychotherapy.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]

con·tract

(kon'trakt, kŏn-trakt')
1. Explicit bilateral commitment by dentist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of therapy.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. To shorten; to become reduced in size.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]
References in periodicals archive ?
As shown in Karaivanov and Martin (2013), in the monopolistic insurer case (when [theta] [right arrow] 0), if u is unbounded below and satisfies a mild technical condition, MPE contracts with and without asset contractibility differ and asset contractibility affects the insurer's profits.
Given subject matter presenting contractibility problems, Coasian bargaining is a particularly attractive alternative because it lets the parties leave the matter open ex ante, saving on transaction costs and avoiding use of dysfunctional provisions.
Intuitively, (i) reflects the structure provided by the heaps, and (ii) the structure needed for contractibility.
It also implies increased contractibility for and standardization of IS assets required by client firms.
Nemati, Character amenability and contractibility of abstract Segal algebras, Bull.
2010) demonstrate that intra-firm trade shares are influenced by the ease of intermediation as measured by a product's revealed contractibility.
We submit that franchisees' fraction of decision rights varies positively with the contractibility of local market assets and negatively with contractibility of system-specific assets.
There is no contractibility problem with respect to these assets.
The following conjecture is a noncompact version of Grove-Petersen's estimate on the geometric contractibility radius for the class of compact manifolds with K(M) [greater than or equal to] - [[lambda].
7) Thyrotoxic stage can influence cardiovascular hemodynamic by increasing heart rate, cardiac contractibility, cardiac output, and decreasing systemic vascular resistance.
Although previous empirical studies include country-specific contracting environment proxy combined with product-specific contractibility proxy to tackle this issue, this paper compares the choice between outsourcing to a given region and in-sourcing to the same region at the firm level.
They create a new measure of product contractibility based on the degree of intermediation in international trade for the product.