tendon

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tendon

 [ten´don]
a cord or band of strong white fibrous tissue that connects a muscle to a bone. When the muscle contracts it pulls on the tendon, which moves the bone. Tendons are extremely tough and are seldom torn, even when an injury is severe enough to break a bone or tear a muscle. One of the most prominent tendons is the achilles tendon.
Frequently injured tendons. From Copstead, 1995.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn), [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that is the part of the muscle (some authorities, however, consider it as part of the muscle complex), which connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when determining the length of a muscle, the tendon length is included as well as the fleshy part; it consists of fascicles of densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): tendo [TA], sinew
[L. tendo]

tendon

/ten·don/ (ten´don) a fibrous cord of connective tissue continuous with the fibers of a muscle and attaching the muscle to bone or cartilage.
Achilles tendon , calcaneal tendon the powerful tendon at the back of the heel, attaching the triceps surae muscle to the calcaneus.
tendon of conus , tendon of infundibulum a collagenous band connecting the posterior surface of the pulmonary annulus and the muscular infundibulum with the root of the aorta.

tendon

(tĕn′dən)
n.
A band of tough, inelastic fibrous tissue that connects a muscle with its bony attachment.

tendon

[ten′dən]
Etymology: Gk, tenon
any one of many white, glistening bands of dense fibrous connective tissue that attach muscle to bone. Except at points of attachment, tendons are parallel bundles of collagenous fibers sheathed in delicate fibroelastic connective tissue. Larger tendons contain a thin internal septum, a few blood vessels, and specialized stereognostic nerves. Tendons are extremely strong, flexible, and inelastic and occur in various lengths and thicknesses. Compare ligament. tendinous, adj.
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Tendon

ten·don

(ten'dŏn) [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when the length of a muscle is determined, the tendon length is included; it consists of fascicles of very densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): sinew, tendo.
[L. tendo]

tendon

A strong band of COLLAGEN fibres that joins muscle to bone or cartilage and transmits the force of muscle contraction to cause movement. Tendons are often provided with sheaths in which they move smoothly, lubricated by a fluid secreted by the sheath lining. Tendons may become inflamed, or may be torn or cut.

tendon

a bunch of parallel COLLAGEN fibres making up a band of CONNECTIVE TISSUE which serves to attach a muscle to a bone. The fibres become continuous with the collagen sheath around the muscle fibres and with the connective tissue covering the bone surface, making a strong cord with no weak connections.

Tendon

A tough cord of dense white fibrous connective tissue that connects a muscle with some other part, especially a bone, and transmits the force which the muscle exerts.

tendon

a band of white fibrous connective tissue that joins muscle to bone. Tendons consist of parallel bundles of collagen with little elastic tissue. This results in excellent mechanical strength but little elasticity. Tendons focus the strength of muscle contraction on a relatively small area of bone, maximizing pull and facilitating movement of the bone. paratendon the fibrous sheath around a tendon, with a thin synovial lining.

tendon

'strap' of non-elastic collagenous fibrous tissue conveying muscle force to bone, to bring about movement of an interposed joint; formed of white, non-elastic tissue; continuous with muscle sheath and intramuscular septa; inserts into periosteum and underlying cortical bone see sharpey's fibres

tendon,

n strong fibrous tissue that connects skeletal muscle to bone. Also called
sinew.
Enlarge picture
Tendon.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn) [TA]
Nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that is part of muscles (some authorities, however, consider it as part of the muscle complex), which connects fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure.
[L. tendo]

tendon,

n the white, glistening fibrous bands of tissue that attach muscle to bone.

tendon

a sheet, cord or band of strong white fibrous tissue that connects a muscle to a bone or other structure. When the muscle contracts, or shortens, it pulls on the tendon. Tendons serve to convey an action to a remote site, change the direction of pull and focus the force. Sheetlike tendons (aponeuroses) serve to support and squeeze, cordlike ones to act on joints. See also cunean tendon.

tendon aponeuroses
bowed tendon
chronic tendinitis of the superficial flexor tendons, usually of the front limbs, of a horse. The horse is lame or inclined to lameness, the tendon is thickened and is visibly enlarged. It may be painful on palpation in the early, acute stages.
calcaneal tendon
tendon cartilaginous metaplasia
focal metaplasia with the formation of cartilage in tendons causes no apparent harm and is considered to be normal.
common calcanean tendon
congenital tendon contracture
an inherited contracture of multiple tendons is identified in cattle. The joints are fixed in extension or flexion and cause serious dystocia. See also akabane virus disease.
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Congenital contracture of flexor tendons. By permission from Blowey RW, Weaver AD, Diseases and Disorders of Cattle, Mosby, 1997
contracted t's
see tendon contracture (below).
tendon contracture
permanent contraction of a tendon caused by chronic tendinitis. Most commonly of the flexor tendons of the digit in the horse. The action of the affected limb is restricted and the limb is not fully extended at rest causing the animal to stand up on its toe. Called also contracted tendons.
flexor t's
tendons of the superficial and deep flexor muscles of the digit. Commonly strained, lacerated and separated in the racing horse.
tendon graft
done in horses with badly torn or ruptured flexor tendons. Autologous grafts are taken from the lateral digital extensor tendon.
hamstring tendon
tendon implants
internal biceps tendon
a core of fibrous tissue within the biceps muscle of horses which serves a significant role in the stay apparatus.
interosseous tendon
suspensory ligament (1).
tendon luxation
slipping of the superficial flexor tendon of the hindlimb of the horse off the tuber calcis, usually in the medial direction; also occurs rarely in dogs and ostriches. See also perosis.
tendon osseous metaplasia
a pathological abnormality and usually attended by abnormality of movement. See also tendon ossification (below).
tendon ossification
occurs extensively in gallinaceous birds in the tendons of the legs and feet, the wings and the epaxial musculature. Although the ossification may be extensive the birds are normal and the reasons for the changes are unknown.
prepubic tendon
the tendon of insertion of the two abdominal recti muscles on to the pubis.
tendon sheath
a fluid-filled sleeve that resembles a synovial bursa wrapped around the tendon so as to form a continuous sheath, except for the mesotendon.
tendon splitting
performed by slitting the superficial flexor tendon (or the suspensory ligament) along its long axis and from lateral to medial sides as a treatment for tendinitis. The objective is to stimulate vascularization and hasten repair.
tendon sprain
see sprain.
sprained tendon
see tendon strain (below).
tendon strain
the injury caused to flexor tendons in the horse during racing. Most commonly affected is the superficial flexor tendon in the front limb. See also bowed tendon (above). Called also sprained tendon.
symphysial tendon
a vertical median sheet which hangs from the pubic symphysis and provides an origin for the medial thigh muscles.