contour feathers


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Related to contour feathers: Flight feathers, Down feathers

contour feathers

the vaned feathers possessing barbules that chiefly cover the body of a bird and give it a streamlined form. Those which extend beyond the body on the wings and serve for flight are termed flight feathers.
References in periodicals archive ?
At 40 days, the body was covered with contour feathers, although semiplumes were still seen in the neck, flanks, and around the vent, and the primaries were half-grown.
I suggest the first molt cycle under the H-P system should include a bird's first acquisition of contour feathers, and thus propose that the first molt cycle begin with commencement of the initial acquisition of these feathers.
My proposal to start the first molt cycle with commencement of the initial acquisition of contour feathers makes the H-P system more facile with respect to species that have a presupplemental molt that precedes the conventional first prebasic molt (Thompson 2004) and species that have a uniformly-complete conventional first prebasic molt (Table 2).
The fluorescence was purple-red shading to dark purple, and no fluorescence was noted on the rectrices, contour feathers or dorsal surfaces.
Our objectives were to investigate: (1) whether dippers have contour feathers similar to those of aquatic or terrestrial bird families in terms of water repellency and resistance to water penetration, and (2) if dippers that dive for their prey have a different feather structure from those that do not dive.
Once birds met, contour feathers were slightly raised and undertail coverts fanned, but the white throat patch was concealed by the low head position and retracted neck.
Loose buffy edging on juvenal contour feathers is typical of immatures of many hummingbird species (Bent 1940, Williamson 2001).
We used white contour feathers of nearly uniform length (~4 cm each) randomly selected from a collection of similar goose feathers to test the effect of sunlight on B.