continuous positive airway pressure


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Related to continuous positive airway pressure: sleep apnea, Bilevel positive airway pressure

continuous positive airway pressure

 (CPAP)
a method of positive pressure ventilation used with patients who are breathing spontaneously, done to keep the alveoli open at the end of exhalation and thus increase oxygenation and reduce the work of breathing. When the same principle is used in mechanical ventilation, it is called positive end-expiratory pressure.

con·tin·u·ous pos·i·tive air·way pres·sure (CPAP),

a technique of respiratory therapy, in either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients, in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit.

continuous positive airway pressure

n.
A technique of respiratory therapy for either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit.

continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)

a method of noninvasive or invasive ventilation assisted by a flow of air delivered at a constant pressure throughout the respiratory cycle. It is performed for patients who can initiate their own respirations but who are not able to maintain adequate arterial oxygen levels without assistance. CPAP may be given through a ventilator and endotracheal tube, through a nasal cannula, or into a hood over the patient's head. Respiratory distress syndrome in the newborn and sleep apnea are often treated with CPAP. Also called constant positive airway pressure, continuous positive pressure breathing. Compare positive end-expiratory pressure.
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Continuous positive airway pressure

continuous positive airway pressure

Critical care A type of artificial ventilation, in which the lung pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure during the entire respiratory cycle. See PEEP.

con·tin·u·ous pos·i·tive air·way pres·sure

(CPAP) (kŏn-tin'yū-ŭs poz'i-tiv ār'wā presh'ŭr)
A technique of respiratory therapy, in either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients, in which the mean airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit.

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)

A ventilation device that blows a gentle stream of air into the nose during sleep to keep the airway open.
Mentioned in: Sleep Apnea, Snoring

continuous positive airway pressure

a method of medical gas administration in which gas is delivered to the patient at positive pressure in order to hold open alveoli that would normally close at the end of expiration and thereby increase oxygenation, preventing atelectasis, and reduce the work of breathing; abbreviated CPAP. It is used with patients who are breathing spontaneously. When the same principle is used in mechanical ventilation, it is called positive end-expiratory pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cardiovascular effects of continuous positive airway pressure in patients with heart failure and obstructive sleep apnea.
We acknowledge the studies referred in the letter as suggestive reports for an independent relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and heart failure as well as for the beneficial effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the prognosis of these patients.
Effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure on neuropsychological function in sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.
Notably, the addition of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), a simple technique requiring an air/oxygen source connected to a patient interface with an expiratory valve to maintain constant positive intrathoracic pressure, to conventional medical therapy leads to a significant reduction in both mortality (-47%) and the need for intubation (-60%) (9).
In most adult patients with moderate to severe OSA, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the first line of treatment.
All of the patients received treatment for their respective conditions, including continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, cognitive behavior therapy and/or hypnotic medication for insomnia, and psychiatric evaluation and possible medication for primary attention deficit disorder.
The studies found that adjustable OAs are nearly as effective as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for patients with a mild form of OSA and are more effective than fixed oral appliances, particularly in patients with moderate to severe OSA.
Particularly at risk are people using Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (C-PAP) and Bi-level Positive Airway Pressure (Bi-PAP) machines for obstructive sleep apnea, various lung conditions, or ALS.
Louis, included 59 patients and is titled "A convenient expiratory positive airway pressure nasal device for the treatment of sleep apnea in patients non-adherent with continuous positive airway pressure.
In patients with heart failure and obstructive sleep apnea, treating the sleep disorder with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves left ventricular function and decreases blood pressure, reported Dr.
This certification covers a wide range of products including: Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Systems, gas blenders, accessories, cardiopulmonary diagnostics, sleep diagnostics, ventilators, oximeter products and respiratory care equipment.

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