analgesia

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Related to continuous epidural analgesia: epidural anesthesia, epidural anaesthesia, continuous epidural anesthesia

analgesia

 [an″al-je´ze-ah]
absence of sensibility to pain, particularly the relief of pain without loss of consciousness; absence of pain or noxious stimulation.
continuous epidural analgesia continuous injection of an anesthetic solution into the sacral and lumbar plexuses within the epidural space to relieve the pain of childbirth, in general surgery to block the pain pathways below the navel, or to relieve chronic unremitting pain.
epidural analgesia analgesia induced by introduction of the analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal.
infiltration analgesia infiltration anesthesia.
patient controlled analgesia (PCA) an apparatus used to relieve acute pain. It consists of a pump attached to an intravenous or subcutaneous injection site and filled with multiple doses of medication that are available when the system is activated by the patient. The pump is programmed to “lock-out” the patient for specified intervals making overdosage unlikely.
patient controlled epidural analgesia patient controlled analgesia in which a narcotic or local anesthetic is administered into the epidural space via a catheter.
relative analgesia in dental anesthesia, a maintained level of conscious sedation short of general anesthesia, usually induced by inhalation of nitrous oxide and oxygen.
transdermal analgesia a method of pain control in which a patch with a rate-controlling membrane is applied to the skin; the medication is deposited in the upper layers of the skin where it is absorbed into the systemic circulation.

an·al·ge·si·a

(an'ăl-jē'zē-ă), Do not confuse this word with anesthesia.
A neurologic or pharmacologic state in which painful stimuli are moderated such that, although still perceived, they are no longer painful. Compare: anesthesia.
[G. insensibility, fr. an- priv. + algēsis, sensation of pain]

analgesia

/an·al·ge·sia/ (an″al-je´ze-ah)
1. absence of sensibility to pain.
2. the relief of pain without loss of consciousness.

continuous epidural analgesia  continuous injection of an anesthetic solution into the sacral and lumbar plexuses within the epidural space to relieve the pain of childbirth; also used in general surgery to block the pain pathways below the navel.
epidural analgesia  analgesia induced by introduction of the analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal.
infiltration analgesia  paralysis of the nerve endings at the site of operation by subcutaneous injection of an anesthetic.
paretic analgesia  loss of the sense of pain accompanied by partial paralysis.
relative analgesia  in dental anesthesia, a maintained level of conscious sedation, short of general anesthesia, in which the pain threshold is elevated; usually induced by inhalation of nitrous oxide and oxygen.
spinal analgesia  analgesia produced by injection of an opioid into the subarachnoid space around the spinal cord.

analgesia

(ăn′əl-jē′zē-ə, -zhə)
n.
A deadening or absence of the sense of pain without loss of consciousness.

an′al·get′ic (-jĕt′ĭk) adj.

analgesia

[an′əljē′zē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, a, algos, without pain
a decreased or absent sensation of pain.

analgesia

The process of relieving or reducing pain; a state of insensitivity to pain, due to:
(1) Pharmacotherapy with an analgesic.
(2) Derangement of sensation.

an·al·ge·si·a

(an'ăl-jē'zē-ă)
1. A neurologic or pharmacologic state in which painful stimuli are so moderated that, although still perceptible, they are no longer painful.
Compare: anesthesia
2. Denotes process of relieving pain.
[G. insensibility, fr. an- priv. + algēsis, sensation of pain]

Analgesia

A state of insensitivity to pain even though the person remains fully conscious.
Mentioned in: Anesthesia, General

analgesia

loss of pain sensation

an·al·ge·si·a

(an'ăl-jē'zē-ă) Do not confuse this word with anesthesia.
A neurologic or pharmacologic state in which painful stimuli are moderated such that, although still perceived, they are no longer painful.
[G. insensibility, fr. an- priv. + algēsis, sensation of pain]

analgesia (an´əljē´zēə),

n an insensibility to pain without loss of consciousness; a state in which painful stimuli are not perceived or interpreted as pain; usually induced by a drug, although trauma or a disease process may produce a general or regional analgesia.
analgesia, diagnostic,
n the administration of a local anesthetic to determine the location, source, or cause of pain.
analgesia, endotracheal
n an inhalation technique in which the anesthetic agent and respiratory gases are passed through a tube inserted in the trachea via either the nose or oral cavity.
analgesia, infiltration,
n the arrest of the sensory responses of nerve endings at the surgical site by injections of an anesthetic at that site.
analgesia, insufflation,
n the delivery of anesthetic gases or vapors directly to the airway of a patient while he or she is breathing room air. Insufflation is usually an open drop method.
analgesia, intranasal,
n the delivery of an analgesic agent to the membrane of the nose by either topical application or insufflation.
analgesia, nonnarcotic,
n drugs that relieve pain by action at the site of the pain. Generally, nonnarcotic analgesics do not produce tolerance or dependence.
analgesia, patient-controlled,
n mechanisms by which the patient can administer and/or control the application of an analgesic agent to an area. One such mechanism is the use of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) to control facial pain. The TENS unit is a variable controlled device designed to deliver a controlled electrical stimulus to the skin surface overlying a painful muscle.
analgesia, regional,
n the reversible loss of pain sensation over an area by blocking the afferent conduction of its innervation with a local anesthetic agent.

analgesia

absence of sensibility to pain, particularly the relief of pain without loss of consciousness; absence of pain or noxious stimulation. See also analgesic.

continuous caudal analgesia
continuous injection of an anesthetic solution into the sacral and lumbar plexuses within the epidural space to relieve the pain of parturition; also used in general surgery to block the pain pathways caudal to the umbilicus (see also caudal anesthesia).
epidural analgesia
analgesia induced by introduction of the analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal. See also epidural.
infiltration analgesia
paralysis of the nerve endings at the site of operation by subcutaneous injection of an anesthetic.
intrasynovial analgesia
surface analgesia, produced by the introduction of a local analgesic agent into the synovial cavity and massaged into tendon sheaths.
intravenous regional analgesia
the local anesthetic agent is injected intravenously caudal to a tourniquet. The tissues below the tourniquet become anesthetized. The tourniquet and the anesthesia can be maintained for up to 15 minutes. Called also Bier block (technique).
local analgesia
injection of an anesthetic agent to create local analgesia. Includes infiltration, nerve block, epidural, intrathecal, intrasynovial, subarachnoid. See anesthesia.
perioperative analgesia
given before, during and after the surgical procedure.
pre-emptive analgesia
administration of long-lasting analgesics before surgery to help to avoid the establishment of a sensitized state and result in diminished postoperative pain.
regional analgesia
see regional anesthesia.
segmental analgesia
see segmental dorsolumbar epidural block.
spinal analgesia
injection of an analgesic agent into the spinal canal, generally either into the subarachnoid or epidural space. See also spinal anesthesia.
surface analgesia
local analgesia produced by an anesthetic applied to the surface of mucous membranes, e.g. those of the eye, nose, throat and urethra.

Patient discussion about analgesia

Q. NO FEELING IN FEET

A. I am not sure I fully understand the situation. Is this no feeling in your feet a chronic symptom or is it new? Chronic loss of sensation in distal parts of your body can result from diabetes (damage to nerve endings) or also PVD- peripheral vascular disease. It depends on your age and how long you have been experiencing this. The treatment varies depending on the cause. Either way you should have a doctor examine you.

More discussions about analgesia
References in periodicals archive ?
Continuous epidural analgesia with bupivacaine-fentanyl versus patient-controlled analgesia with i.

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