continuity of care


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continuity of care

the desired goal of a model of care in which the same generalist physician serves as advisor, advocate, and friend as the patient moves through the various stages of medical care.

continuity of care

Medspeak-UK
A generic term referring to non-disruption of care provided to a patient in the UK throughout his/her care journey.

Medspeak-US
A general term for the uninterrupted management of a patient who passes from one doctor to another.

continuity of care

Medtalk Uninterrupted health care for a condition from the time of first contact–eg, to the point of resolution or long-term maintenance
References in periodicals archive ?
51) However, legislation was filed that would have ensured continuity of care for individuals engaged in continuing course of mental health treatment.
8220;I believe one can overcome any deficiency in continuity of care across borders by establishing a system that includes pre-and post-consultation communication.
Continuity of care by residents without continuity by faculty members may not be sufficient.
Implemented continuity of care in ambulatory surgical critical pathway The continuity of care was realized in all the flows of time, coordination, caring relationship, and information.
Given the patterns that now are the dominant form of organization for medical practices, there is no practical way to reduce the loss of continuity of care, even with the use of electronic systems.
Continuity of care has been defined in a variety of ways.
Three multivariate analyses each using a different continuity of care index, with continuity of care defined as frequency of provider/patient interaction showed a positive correlation between medical errors and continuity of care, and no correlation between disease complexity or severity and the occurrence of medical errors.
In this analysis, we distinguish between the 2 concepts and focus on the sustained continuity of care between a patient and a health care provider through a relationship over time.
In medicine generally, coordination and continuity of care are lauded; their absence is understood as a problem.
Johnson's continuity of care plan involves a clinic follow-up of physical examinations every three months or as needed, chemical 24 panels, viral loads and CD4 count every three months, and annual eye and chest x-rays.
Practice standards and outcomes measurement tools were developed, and patients benefited from continuity of care.
It is true that continuity of care, in the abstract, is an important issue: seeing an illness all the way through helps doctors understand it better.

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