contamination


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Related to contamination: Cross contamination

contamination

 [kon-tam″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the soiling or making inferior by contact or mixture, as by introduction of organisms into a wound.
2. the deposition of radioactive material in any place where it is not desired, especially where its presence may be harmful or constitute a radiation hazard.

con·tam·i·na·tion

(kon-tam'i-nā'shŭn),
1. The presence of an infectious agent on a body surface; also on or in clothes, bedding, toys, surgical instruments or dressings, or other inanimate articles or substances including water, milk, and food, or that infectious agent itself.
2. In epidemiology, the situation that exists when a population being studied for one condition or factor also possesses other conditions or factors that modify results of the study.
3. Freudian term for a fusion and condensation of meanings of words, percepts, or motivations for behavior.
4. The presence of foreign material that adulterates or renders impure a material the composition of which is thereby degraded.
[L. contamino, pp. -atus, to stain, defile]

contamination

/con·tam·i·na·tion/ (kon-tam″ĭ-na-shun)
1. the soiling or making inferior by contact or mixture.
2. the deposition of radioactive material in any place where it is not desired.

contamination1

[-ā′shən]
Etymology: L, contaminare, to pollute
a condition of being soiled, stained, touched, or otherwise exposed to harmful agents, making an object potentially unsafe for use as intended or without barrier techniques. An example is entry of infectious or toxic materials into a previously clean or sterile environment.

contamination

Pollution by an inferior material Infectious disease Introduction of organisms in a wound. See Cross contamination Public health The presence of any foreign or undesired material in a system–eg, toxic contamination of the ground water in an ecosystem or untreated sewage into a stream Radiation physics The deposition of radioactive material in any place where it is not wanted. See Radioactive contamination.

con·tam·i·na·tion

(kŏn-tam'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The presence of an infectious agent on a body surface or on or in clothes, bedding, toys, surgical instruments or dressings, or other inanimate articles or substances including water, milk, and food, or that infectious agent itself.
2. That portion of a chemical, biologic, or radiologic agent that remains on (external contamination) or in(internal contamination) a victim or inanimate object, especially, but not necessarily, after evaporation and absorption.
3. epidemiology The situation that exists when a population being studied for one condition or factor alsopossesses other conditions or factors that modify results of the study.
4. psychology/psychiatry Freudian term for a fusion and condensation of words.
See also: residual dose contamination
[L. contamino, pp. -atus, to stain, defile]

Contamination

Passage of an infectious organism, such as a virus, from an infected person to an object such as a needle, which then, when used, may pass infection to another person.
Mentioned in: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis C

con·tam·i·na·tion

(kŏn-tam'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The presence of an infectious agent on or in something.
2. In epidemiology, the situation that exists when a population being studied for one condition or factor also possesses other conditions or factors that modify results of the study.
3. The presence of foreign material that adulterates or renders impure a material the composition of which is thereby degraded.
[L. contamino, pp. -atus, to stain, defile]

contamination

1. the soiling or making inferior by contact or mixture, as by introduction of infectious organisms into a wound, into water, milk, food or onto the external surface of the body or on bandages and other dressings.
2. the deposition of radioactive material in any place where it is not desired.

Patient discussion about contamination

Q. I'm concerned that my calcium supplements are contaminated w seashells or cow bones. Which brands are best

A. there should be labeled as "from animal source".
here is something that helped me choose:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/calcium-supplements/AN00964

More discussions about contamination
References in periodicals archive ?
PCBA contamination can be detected throughout electronics manufacturing, including the assembly process, test and long-term testing stages, and finished goods.
Oil and gas activities accounted for 50 new cases of contamination - two more than in 2014, even as a drilling slowdown continued.
A: To prevent cross contamination in stainless steel processing equipment, bioprocess engineers must develop and validate clean-in-place (CIP) procedures that remove all residual proteins between processes.
Material causes include contamination, too much reclaim, or insufficient antioxidant.
At this rate it will take 60 years to cleanup the country's nuclear contamination, assuming no more is produced.
Virtually all of the seed corn in this country has at least a trace of GMO contamination and often more.
Contamination of the recording medium is a major concern as well, since this can affect the laser's ability to read and write data.
There had been an assumption that much of the carcass contamination was coming from the hide," he notes.
Because the same taxpayer contaminated the property and incurred the costs concerning the contamination, the interim break in ownership should not, in and of itself, operate to disallow a deduction under the general principles of Sec.
It sounds like something out of a bad science fiction movie: cross- contamination, antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, even killer viruses.
Moreover, to the extent the TAM reflects an IRS policy to allow current deductibility only when the source of contamination continues to pose a health hazard, such a policy is, at best, highly questionable.

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