contaminated sharp

contaminated sharp

Any object that is capable of penetrating mucocutaneous surfaces including, but not limited to, needles, scalpels, broken glass, broken capillary tubes, and exposed ends of dental wires, which is contaminated by blood and/or pathogens
References in periodicals archive ?
The goals of Standard Precautions include 1) preventing contact between a patient's body fluids and health care personnel's mucous membranes (including conjunctivae), skin, and clothing; 2) preventing health care personnel from carrying potentially infectious material from one patient to another; and 3) avoiding unnecessary exposure to contaminated sharp implements.
This would ensure protection even if the dose is partially administered in circumstances where, for example, a patient struggles so the needle is removed and healthcare workers are exposed to a contaminated sharp in a dangerous situation.
According to Wood, all perioperative team members should limit the amount of surface contamination with blood and body fluids from the patient and follow AORN's Recommended Practices for Sharps Safety to minimize the risk of injury from a contaminated sharp device.
Such a design helps to ensure protection even if the dose is partially administered in circumstances where, for instance, a patient struggles so the needle is removed and healthcare workers or caregivers are exposed to a contaminated sharp in a dangerous situation.
A large number of injuries by contaminated sharp devices can be prevented by implementing suitable educational programs regarding disposal of sharp devices, and by using safe needle devices.
This signifies that probably acquiring the infection is related to the risk of contaminated sharp injuries.
During the flooding, there's an increased risk of infection through potential cuts from contaminated sharp objects, such as broken glass, wood, and other debris," warned Arafat.
Contaminated sharp objects can transmit bloodborne pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency (HIV), hepatitis B (HBV), and hepatitis C (HCV) viruses.
Safe-search technique training for, and in the handling of, potentially contaminated sharp contraband, such as shanks, razor blades or tattoo guns, also is important.
In one instance, we identified a need to improve the way in which we handled and disposed of our contaminated sharp glass, primarily pipettes.
The needle becomes fully encapsulated as it is removed from the patient, preventing any external exposure of the contaminated sharp, thus reducing the risk of a needlestick injury.

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