contagion

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contagion

 [kon-ta´jun]
1. the spread of disease from one individual to another.
2. a contagious disease.

con·ta·gion

(kon-tā'jŭn),
1. Synonym(s): contagium
2. Transmission of infection by direct contact, droplet spread, or contaminated fomites. The term originated long before development of modern ideas of infectious disease and has since lost much of its significance, being included under the more inclusive term "communicable disease."
3. Production through suggestion or imitation of a neurosis or psychosis in several or more members of a group.
[L. contagio; fr. contingo, to touch closely]

contagion

/con·ta·gion/ (kon-ta´jun)
1. the communication of disease from one individual to another.
2. a contagious disease.

contagion

(kən-tā′jən)
n.
1.
a. Disease transmission by direct or indirect contact.
b. A disease that is or may be transmitted by direct or indirect contact; a contagious disease.
c. The direct cause, such as a bacterium or virus, of a communicable disease.
2. Psychology The spread of a behavior pattern, attitude, or emotion from person to person or group to group through suggestion, propaganda, rumor, or imitation.

contagion

[kəntā′jən]
Etymology: L, contingere, to touch
the transmission of an infection by direct contact, droplet spread, or contact with contaminated fomites, such as clothing, bedding, dishes, or other objects the infected person has used.

contagion

Microbiology
A term of waning clinical use for:
(1) The transmission of an infectious disease from one person to another;
(2) An infection.
  
Psychiatry
Risk of suicide linked to exposure to suicidal behaviour in family, peer group or media.

con·ta·gion

(kŏn-tā'jŭn)
1. Synonym(s): contagium.
2. Transmission of infection by direct contact, droplet spread, or contaminated fomites.
3. Production through suggestion or imitation of a neurosis or psychosis in several or more members of a group.
Synonym(s): infectious (2) .
[L. contagio; fr. contingo, to touch closely]

con·ta·gion

(kŏn-tā'jŭn)
Transmission of infection by direct contact, droplet spread, or contaminated fomites.
[L. contagio; fr. contingo, to touch closely]

contagion

1. the spread of disease from one animal to another.
2. a contagious disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, the possibility of risk contagion is relatively low in the Chinese interbank market.
The key to maintain the stability of the system is to identify the risk contagion and promote effective regulatory policies to guarantee against the initial contagion shock.
Ladley [18] finds that for smaller shocks interbank lending relationships can reduce the financial contagion effects through risk sharing.
So large banks can absorb part of the loss to reduce the pressure of risk sharing and then their failures are more likely to lead to risk contagion.
The financial crisis has rekindled interest in risk contagion in the interbank market.
We find that the links between banks become tighter and tighter in recent years, and the bank with a high "degree" easily leads to risk contagion, though the "domino" effects through interbank risk exposures are not significant.
Despite the fact that the danger of risk contagion is normally confined to a limited number of relatively large banks, bank failures remain a possibility affecting a sizeable part of the banking system.
In the future we could take this circumstance into account and simulate these far more complicated processes of contagion and risk sharing as well.
Gale, "Financial contagion," Journal of Political Economy, vol.
Muller, "Interbank credit lines as a channel of contagion, " Journal of Financial Services Research, vol.
Mistrulli, "Assessing financial contagion in the interbank market: maximum entropy versus observed interbank lending patterns," Journal of Banking & Finance, vol.