contagion


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contagion

 [kon-ta´jun]
1. the spread of disease from one individual to another.
2. a contagious disease.

con·ta·gion

(kon-tā'jŭn),
1. Synonym(s): contagium
2. Transmission of infection by direct contact, droplet spread, or contaminated fomites. The term originated long before development of modern ideas of infectious disease and has since lost much of its significance, being included under the more inclusive term "communicable disease."
3. Production through suggestion or imitation of a neurosis or psychosis in several or more members of a group.
[L. contagio; fr. contingo, to touch closely]

contagion

/con·ta·gion/ (kon-ta´jun)
1. the communication of disease from one individual to another.
2. a contagious disease.

contagion

(kən-tā′jən)
n.
1.
a. Disease transmission by direct or indirect contact.
b. A disease that is or may be transmitted by direct or indirect contact; a contagious disease.
c. The direct cause, such as a bacterium or virus, of a communicable disease.
2. Psychology The spread of a behavior pattern, attitude, or emotion from person to person or group to group through suggestion, propaganda, rumor, or imitation.

contagion

[kəntā′jən]
Etymology: L, contingere, to touch
the transmission of an infection by direct contact, droplet spread, or contact with contaminated fomites, such as clothing, bedding, dishes, or other objects the infected person has used.

contagion

Microbiology
A term of waning clinical use for:
(1) The transmission of an infectious disease from one person to another;
(2) An infection.
  
Psychiatry
Risk of suicide linked to exposure to suicidal behaviour in family, peer group or media.

con·ta·gion

(kŏn-tā'jŭn)
1. Synonym(s): contagium.
2. Transmission of infection by direct contact, droplet spread, or contaminated fomites.
3. Production through suggestion or imitation of a neurosis or psychosis in several or more members of a group.
Synonym(s): infectious (2) .
[L. contagio; fr. contingo, to touch closely]

con·ta·gion

(kŏn-tā'jŭn)
Transmission of infection by direct contact, droplet spread, or contaminated fomites.
[L. contagio; fr. contingo, to touch closely]

contagion

1. the spread of disease from one animal to another.
2. a contagious disease.
References in classic literature ?
One day, in the midst of these dismal times, a wild figure approached the portal of the Province House, and folding his arms, stood contemplating the scarlet banner which a passing breeze shook fitfully, as if to fling abroad the contagion that it typified.
Just as luck would have it, the Jessie caught the contagion as well.
And when the fiddler, peering into the front room, remarked to the pianist, "It's Burning Daylight," the waltz-time perceptibly quickened, and the dancers, catching the contagion, began to whirl about as if they really enjoyed it.
Michael, however, yielding to the contagion, sat beside his mother and barked angrily out across the increasing stretch of water as he would have barked at any danger that crept and rustled in the jungle.
Of contracting the contagion," the other corrected smoothly.
Time and again the guarding line was drawn back twenty or thirty miles to escape the contagion of the multitudinous dead.
There is no such thing as dead, inert matter: it is all alive; all instinct with force, actual and potential; all sensitive to the same forces in its environment and susceptible to the contagion of higher and subtler ones residing in such superior organisms as it may be brought into relation with, as those of man when he is fashioning it into an instrument of his will.
As mankind, in the days I was speaking of, was not yet arrived at that pitch of madness which I find they are capable of now, and which, to be sure, I have only escaped by living alone, and at a distance from the contagion, there was a considerable rising in favour of Monmouth; and my principles strongly inclining me to take the same part, I determined to join him; and Mr Watson, from different motives concurring in the same resolution (for the spirit of a gamester will carry a man as far upon such an occasion as the spirit of patriotism), we soon provided ourselves with all necessaries, and went to the duke at Bridgewater.
All his bluster had gone, and he seemed to have caught the contagion of preternatural calm.
As he watches the spasmodic shoots and darts that break out of her face and limbs, like fitful lightning out of a dark sky, some contagion in them seizes upon him: insomuch that he has to withdraw himself to a lean arm-chair by the hearth--placed there, perhaps, for such emergencies--and to sit in it, holding tight, until he has got the better of this unclean spirit of imitation.
These are the men of whom Solomon says, 'They go like an ox to the slaughter, till a dart strikes through their liver'; an admirable description, by the way, of the foul disease, which is a poisonous deadly contagion mingling with the blood, whose centre or foundation is in the liver; from whence, by the swift circulation of the whole mass, that dreadful nauseous plague strikes immediately through his liver, and his spirits are infected, his vitals stabbed through as with a dart.
The contagion spread like a dread fever: an infectious madness, as yet not near its height, seized on new victims every hour, and society began to tremble at their ravings.