contact precautions

contact precautions

guidelines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for reducing the risk of transmission of epidemiologically important microorganisms by direct or indirect contact. Direct-contact transmission involves skin-to-skin contact and physical transfer of microorganisms to a susceptible host from an infected or colonized person. This can occur when health care personnel perform patient-care activities that require physical contact, such as turning or bathing the patient. Direct-contact transmission can also occur between two patients, such as by hand contact, with one patient serving as the source of infectious microorganisms and the other as a susceptible host. Indirect-contact transmission involves contact of a susceptible host with a contaminated intermediate object, usually inanimate, in the patient's environment. Contact Precautions apply to specified patients known or suspected to be infected or colonized with epidemiologically important microorganisms that can be transmitted by direct or indirect contact. See also standard precautions, transmission-based precautions. Compare Airborne Precautions, Droplet Precautions.

con·tact pre·cau·tions

(kon'takt prĕ-kaw'shŭnz)
Procedures that reduce the risk of spread of infections through direct or indirect contact. Transmission occurs with physical contact of the infected patient or handling of a contaminated object in the infected patient's room. Masks, gowns, and gloves as well as standard precautions (q.v.) must be used by health care providers when in the infected patient's room.
References in periodicals archive ?
auris infection to single rooms and placed on contact precautions for one to three months with two consecutive negative screens at least a week apart to be removed from isolation (21017c).
Contact precautions around infected patients, hand hygiene, environmental cleaning, and antibiotic stewardship were the main strategies.
Contact Precautions were recommended for colonized patients in health care facilities.
Application of stringent contact precautions, including dedicated use of clinical items to VRE carriers; and
Meanwhile, because the delayed diagnosis meant the patient--who had been treated across several wards --had potentially exposed multiple health care workers and patients to Sarcoptes scabiei, the hospital immediately instituted contact precautions and implemented its outbreak protocols: communication statements, prophylactic treatment of asymptomatic staff and close patients, and treatment and quarantine for those with clinical symptoms.
The benefits of routine enforcement of contact precautions must be balanced against additional costs, impediments to patient care, and exposure to ESBL-producing E.
On the basis of the same evidence and assumptions, we are willing to wrap ourselves in plastic and confine patients to their hospital rooms--that is, to use contact precautions.
Droplet precautions should be added to the standard precautions when providing care to patients with symptoms of acute respiratory infections; contact precautions and eye protection should be added when caring for probable or confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection; airborne precautions should be applied when performing aerosol generating procedures.
The hand washing component of the study required participants to enter an isolation room using contact precautions and perform specific nursing duties for a simulated patient.
These recommendations are based on expert opinion and knowledge of the transmission mechanism, but there is limited evidence that contact precautions make a significant difference to transmission of MDROs, over and above good hand hygiene and adherence to basic infection control principles.
Effect of contact precautions on wait times from emergency room disposition to inpatient admission.
Sources say that these contact precautions (CPs) can be disruptive to the quality of patient care and use up valuable physician time and hospital resources (1).