consumerism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

consumerism

a policy dedicated to promoting the interests of consumers as a whole.
References in periodicals archive ?
12) By extending existing literature from green to ethical consumerism, this study addresses the more self-centered aspects behind ethical consumerism, as well as cultural factors and attention to media content that have influenced the rise in such behavior.
Consumerism arose from a certain set of circumstances; as circumstances change, other economic arrangements will become adaptive.
The 2015 HealthCare Consumerism Superstars and Innovators will be formally honored during an Awards dinner ceremony held the evening of November 17 in conjunction with The Institute for HealthCare Consumerism's 2015 IHC FORUM West conference at Red Rock Resort, Las Vegas, NV.
Rittenhouse sees Tillich's theology as a starting point for theological attempts to counter consumerism with Christianity.
The purpose of this article is to contrast the secular academic literature on consumerism with Catholic theological literature on consumerism.
One usage of consumerism refers to a social movement; as such, business and economics generally view the word favorably: "it is about the empowerment of consumers as citizens, upholding their rights, protecting them from abuses of power, and supplying them with objective information that will help them to make rational choices.
The Report, which acts as a barometer of ethical spending in the UK, shows that in 2005 UK ethical consumerism was worth GBP29.
The author examines her thesis of the "irresistible Americanization of Europe" with reference to a number of innovations including the introduction of supermarkets and chain stores, the popularity of Hollywood films and celebrities among European audiences, the spread of service associations such as Rotary, the adoption of big brand marketing and the general inculcation of consumerism among the mass of the population.
government played in promoting consumerism in the first half of the twentieth century, and the role that public schools played in promoting consumerism in the latter part of the twentieth century.
These features also made class status--or the signs of it--attainable to virtually anyone through consumerism.
Philip Lenahan, a Catholic financial counselor from California who's written about consumerism and debt, says he sees no common thread among those who get into trouble, except "they're getting younger and younger," as financially naive college students are swamped with offers for credit cards.
Full browser ?