constructivism

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constructivism

in the philosophy of science, the doctrine that people actively construct their reality on the basis of their beliefs and expectations. Also known as constructionism. constructivist a person who espouses constructivism.
References in periodicals archive ?
the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES), for assessing students' perceptions of the psychosocial environment that should exist in constructivist translation classrooms and reports comprehensive validation information for a large sample of university students from Iran.
We then move to a comparison of constructivist as opposed to ecological decisionmaking and the distinction between Knightian risk and uncertainty in the subsequent two sections.
Note that realist constructivists would not face such a problem regarding summative assessment.
Despite the increased use of constructivist career applications during the past 15 years, some authors have also noted potential limitations to constructivist approaches (e.
If the avant-garde of the late 20th century might answer that question affirmatively, it is not clear that the Constructivists did.
For the second stage or for advanced knowledge acquisition, preliminary constructivist approach and cognitivist approach may be introduced into which tasks require students to have an increased level of processing.
Real life situations which help to put problem solving into practice and their subsequent transferal to other real situations are significant contexts for constructivists.
According to Mintz, I am to be labeled constructivist because I believe that historical events, even and especially the Holocaust, possess no inherent meanings, but that their meaning is constructed by communities of interpretation.
The debate on this issue has polarized into two extreme camps: scientific positivism and constructivist epistemology.
Constructivists argue that the boundaries between disciplines are important as the objects of political conflict, broadly defined.