constrictive pericarditis


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con·stric·tive per·i·car·di·tis

postinflammatory thickening and scarring of the membrane producing constriction of the cardiac chambers; may be acute, subacute, or chronic. Formerly called chronic constrictive pericarditis.

constrictive pericarditis

n.
Fibrous thickening of the pericardium that restricts diastolic filling of the heart, often resulting from infection, surgery, or radiation.

constrictive pericarditis

a fibrous thickening of the pericardium caused by gradual scarring or fibrosis. The pericardium may undergo calcification and gradually becomes rigid, resisting the normal dilation of the heart chambers during the blood-filling phases of the cardiac cycle.

constrictive pericarditis

Cardiology A condition characterized by a chronic inflammation, fibrosis and scarring of a pericardium contracted to the point of compromising normal diastolic filling of the ventricles Etiology Infection, connective tissue disease, malignancy, trauma, metabolic disorders–eg uremia, RT, sarcoidosis, asbestosis, previous MI, TB, viral infection, cardiac surgery Clinical Right-sided CHF, ↓ cardiac output Complications Cardiac tamponade, pulmonary edema Management Surgical incision. See Pericardium.

con·stric·tive per·i·car·di·tis

(kŏn-strik'tiv per'i-kahr-dī'tis)
Postinflammatory thickening and scarring of the membrane producing constriction of the cardiac chambers; may be acute, subacute, or chronic. Formerly called chronic constrictive pericarditis.

constrictive pericarditis

Inflammation and thickening by fibrous tissue of the outer covering of the heart (pericardium) that prevents normal relaxation and filling of the heart chambers. Also known as Pick's disease (F.J. Pick, 1867–1926, German physician).

pericarditis

inflammation of the pericardium. Initially there is an audible friction rub on auscultation. Later as fluid accumulates there is a muffling of the heart sounds and sometimes a washing machine sound on auscultation. Congestive heart failure develops terminally. Classified according to exudate produced as fibrinous, fibrinohemorrhagic, hemorrhagic, purulent.

bread-and-butter pericarditis
constrictive pericarditis
adhesions between the epicardium and pericardium limit the movement of the heart sometimes sufficiently to cause congestive heart failure.
niche pericarditis
see niche pericarditis.
traumatic pericarditis
occurs in cattle and goats, rarely sheep, when a sharp foreign body is swallowed and lodges in the reticulum, subsequently perforating its wall. The perforation may go as far forward as the pericardial sac, especially if the animal is pregnant. The animal dies of a combination of congestive heart failure and toxemia due to the bacterial infection.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chylous ascites and chylothorax due to constrictive pericarditis in a patient infected with HIV: A case report.
Prognostic predictors in pericardiectomy for chronic constrictive pericarditis.
Compared with CT, cardiac magnetic resonance is probably the preferred technique to optimally assess constrictive pericarditis, as it equally provides morphological data and functional information about the hemodynamic consequences on cardiac filling [4].
Among these, the change in the ventricular pressure curves during the respiratory cycle (reflecting ventricular interdependence) is unique to patients with constrictive pericarditis [4].
Clinical characteristics of constrictive pericarditis patients and normal subjects
Pericardial calcification can be detected on chest radiograph in about half of the cases of constrictive pericarditis.
Constrictive pericarditis is a rare condition characterised by clinical signs of right heart failure subsequent to loss of pericardial compliance.
This allows the distinction between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy, which can both be clinically and haemodymically indistinguishable (Fig.
SVC syndrome, constrictive pericarditis, dysphagia, odynophagia, and tracheoesophageal fistula might also result.
Pericardial diseases are relatively common in clinical practice, presenting in one of three ways: pericarditis (which may recur or become chronic), pericardial effusion with or without pericardial tamponade and constrictive pericarditis.