constriction


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Related to constriction: constriction ring, pupillary constriction

constriction

 [kon-strik´shun]
a narrowing or compression of a part; a stricture.

con·stric·tion

(kon-strik'shŭn),
1. A normally or pathologically contracted or narrowed portion of a structure.
See also: stricture, stenosis. Synonym(s): constrictio [TA]
2. The act or process of binding or contracting, becoming narrowed; the condition of being constricted. squeezed.
3. A subjective sensation of pressure or tightness, as if the body or any body part were tightly bound or squeezed.
[L. con-stringo, pp. -strictus, to draw together]

constriction

/con·stric·tion/ (kon-strik´shun)
1. a narrowing or compression of a part; a stricture.constric´tive
2. a diminution in range of thinking or feeling, associated with diminished spontaneity.

constriction

[kənstrik′shən]
Etymology: L, constringere, to draw tight
an abnormal closing or reduction in the size of an opening or passage of the body, as in vasoconstriction of a blood vessel. See also stenosis.
The self-imposed narrowing of a suicidal individual’s outlooks and options

con·stric·tion

(kŏn-strik'shŭn)
1. A normally or pathologically constricted or narrowed portion of a luminal structure.
Synonym(s): constrictio [TA] .
2. The act or process of binding or contracting, becoming narrowed; the condition of being constricted or squeezed.
3. A subjective sensation of pressure or tightness, as if the body or any part were tightly bound or squeezed.
See also: stricture, stenosis
[L. con-stringo, pp. -strictus, to draw together]

constriction

1. A narrowing.
2. The act or process of narrowing.

con·stric·tion

(kŏn-strik'shŭn)
1. [TA] A normally or pathologically contracted or narrowed portion of a structure.
2. The act or process of binding or contracting, becoming narrowed; the condition of being constricted or squeezed.
[L. con-stringo, pp. -strictus, to draw together]

constriction (kənstrik´shən),

n an abnormal closing or reduction in the size of an opening or passage of the body.

constriction

a narrowing or compression of a part; a stricture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Greer (4) observed that B, irregularis preferentially constricts larger prey and a combination of both envenomation and constriction may be used in the wild (3).
040 inch of constriction, which put bore diameter at the muzzle at .
But in addition to weight, commanders have to look at constriction and how much ability soldiers have to move their arms and legs and get in and out of vehicles quickly, Spoehr said.
Piker describes "a politically based constriction of Native opportunity.
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The amount of constriction depends upon the energy fed into the magnet (usually a maximum of 5 amps).
Freed from vocal constriction, he sang vigorously, pleasingly and movingly.
Louis, Missouri, urban particles (UPs; Standard Reference Material 1648) on the constriction of isolated rat pulmonary artery tings and the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells with or without losartan, an antagonist of A[T.
It works by reducing the number of leukotrienes in the blood which cause inflammation and constriction of the lungs and airways.
bore constriction gauge assembly, NSN 1010-01-138-4862