constrict

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constrict

V.
1. To narrow or make smaller, to shrink or contract.
2. To squeeze or compress.
References in periodicals archive ?
Treatment of penile strangulation caused by constricting devices.
Finally, tests indicated that the women suffered from coronary spasms, which occur when the smooth muscle of the coronary arteries suddenly contracts, constricting the heart's blood supply.
Typical symptoms include the horse grabbing a wood rail or other object, arching its neck, constricting the larynx and "sucking air," which releases endorphins that produce an unnatural "high.
Healthy vessels secrete EDRF to balance the constricting effect of [epinephrine]," Yeung says.
These solutions enable companies developing microprocessors, high-performance digital signal processing chips, high-end graphics processors, and high-speed telecommunications chips to design, verify, and deliver working silicon within today's constricting market windows.
Laragh points out that renin converts a blood protein to angiotensin II, which helps regulate blood pressure by constricting the vessels, including the coronary arteries.
At a time when many competitors are closing data centers and constricting their points of presence, NTT America is continuing to establish and expand its presence across the United States.
This, he says, implies that the recently isolated compound exerts the same cardiac effects as plant ouabain: strengthening the heartbeat and constricting blood vessels.
The rating is based on AIG's well-diversified business position, which is poised to strengthen further in light of constricting capacity, a track record of excellent operating performance that should improve further given significant rate improvements, and very strong capitalization.
That observation fits with the theory that the increased risk at awakening and rising results from the activation of the body's sympathetic nervous system, which boosts heart rate and raises blood pressure by temporarily constricting arteries.
Scientists have observed that blacks often have elevated levels of catecholamines, hormones that raise blood pressure by constricting blood vessels.