constitutional

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constitutional

 [kon″stĭ-too´shun-al]
1. pertaining to the constitution.
2. affecting the whole constitution of the body; not local.
constitutional disease one involving a system of organs or one with widespread symptoms.

con·sti·tu·tion·al

(kon'sti-tū'shŭn-ăl),
1. Relating to a body's constitution.
2. General; relating to the system as a whole; not local.

con·sti·tu·tion·al

(kon'sti-tū'shŭn-ăl)
1. Relating to a body's constitution.
2. General; relating to the system as a whole; not local.

constitutional

1. affecting the whole constitution of the body; not local.
2. pertaining to the constitution.

Patient discussion about constitutional

Q. What really constitutes ADD? Don't all kids have short attention spans because they are curious? What I'm saying is. I'm a very curious fellow, so, therefore, I cannot hold my attention to one thing for more than a minute. Does this mean I have ADD?

A. to what you said about how come they didn't have all these problems lots of years ago, I'll have to say it is true the kids today have a lot more stimulations than what kids had a 100 years ago, though, these problems- ADD and ADHD did exist, even with less things around to lose focus to. even about 20 years ago, when the awareness was too small, teachers just called these kids "stupid" or slow, cause they wern't able to listen for a long period of time and then did'nt know what to answer when asked. the awareness helped save lots of very smart focusless kids...

More discussions about constitutional
References in periodicals archive ?
These laws have no valid applications, not because every token of flag burning, speech by Republicans, or speech criticizing the government is constitutionally immune to regulation, but because such acts are constitutionally immune to regulation under rules the terms of which refer to certain disfavored ideas or persons.
Calling the House "the most constitutionally vulnerable of the three branches" to continuity problems, the commission recommended a constitutional amendment giving governors the power to appoint emergency replacements until elections could be held (thanks to the 17th Amendment, senators can already be replaced by gubernatorial appointment).
Brosseau provides one example of a use of force by a police officer that, while constitutionally questionable, was certainly in the "sometimes hazy border between excessive and acceptable force," and, therefore, the officer was entitled to qualified immunity.
Unless the Supreme Court grants certiorari and says other wise, investment tax credits based on the location of an investment are constitutionally impermissible.
Section 2204(c)(1) of title 44 provides that exemption (b)(5) of section 552 is not available to the Archivist as a basis for withholding records, but section 2204(c)(2) recognizes that the former President or the incumbent President may assert any constitutionally based privileges, including those ordinarily encompassed within exemption (b)(5) of section 552.
Thus, a law or an administrative rule can be constitutionally optional, but so too can an administrative or judicial decision in an individual case not covered by a pre-existing rule.
Some observers believe that the UISUTA's underlying premise, that the state of origin can impose a tax on sales bound for other states, is constitutionally flawed.
The Massachusetts Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers objects to statements made in the current campaign for governor suggesting that persons who perform the constitutionally mandated role of attorney for the defense in criminal cases are unfit for or disqualified from public office.
The coach did not take kindly to the school district's demands that he discontinue his constitutionally dubious activities.
5528, denominated the Pornography Jurisdiction Act, which provides, in part, "No court created by Act of Congress shall have jurisdiction, and the Supreme Court shall have no appellate jurisdiction, to hear or decide a question of whether a State pornography law imposes a constitutionally invalid restriction on the freedom of expression.
Unsatisfied with Scalia's explanation that privacy is not constitutionally protected, Berndt then asked, "Do you sodomize your wife?
But legal scholar Robert Levy, a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, argues that federal action is not constitutionally appropriate "unless and until Second Amendment rights are compromised.