constitution

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constitution

 [kon″stĭ-too´shun]
1. the make-up or functional habit of the body, determined by the genetic, biochemical, and physiologic endowment of the individual, and modified in great measure by environmental factors.
2. in chemistry, the atoms making up a molecule and the way they are linked, the property that distinguishes a compound from its structural isomers.

con·sti·tu·tion

(kon'sti-tū'shŭn),
1. The physical makeup of a body, including the mode of performance of its functions, the activity of its metabolic processes, the manner and degree of its reactions to stimuli, and its power of resistance to the attack of pathogenic organisms or other disease processes.
2. chemistry the number and kind of atoms in the molecule and the relation they bear to each other.
[L. constitutio, constitution, disposition, fr. constituo, pp. -stitutus, to establish, fr. statuo, to set up]

constitution

/con·sti·tu·tion/ (kon″stĭ-too´shun)
1. the make-up or functional habit of the body.constitu´tional
2. the arrangement of atoms in a molecule.

constitution

the general bodily health of an individual, expressed by the person's physical and mental ability to function adequately in adverse circumstances.

constitution

Fringe medicine
Iris constitution, see there.

Homeopathy
Constitutional type, see there.
 
Psychiatry
A person’s intrinsic physical and psychologic endowment. Constitution may refer to a person’s physical inheritance or intellectual potential.

Vox populi
The founding document for a government, which delineates its essential principles and the rights of its people.

constitution

Psychiatry A person's intrinsic physical and psychologic endowment; sometimes used more narrowly to indicate physical inheritance or intellectual potential

con·sti·tu·tion

(kon'sti-tū'shŭn)
1. The physical makeup of a body, including the mode of performance of its functions, the activity of its metabolic processes, the manner and degree of its reactions to stimuli, and its power of resistance to the attack of pathogenic organisms.
2. chemistry The number and kind of atoms in the molecule and the relation they bear to each other.
[L. constitutio, constitution, disposition, fr. constituo, pp. -stitutus, to establish, fr. statuo, to set up]

constitution,

n 1. the fundamental components that form a human being or thing.
2. the total configuration of traits, physical and mental, that categorize a person. This compendium will consider both the effects of nature and nurture on that person. See also homeopathic medicine, constitutional; consitutional prescribing, constitution, carbonic; constitution, epidemic; constitution, fluoric; constitution, phosphoric; sensitive type; constitution, sulphuric; susceptibility; and typology.
constitution, carbonic,
n one of the three body types developed by Nebel; consists of squat, stout, often obese people with joint hypolaxity. The homeopathic remedy is calcarea carbonica. Also called
brevilinear constitution. See constitution, fluoric and constitution, phosphoric.
constitution, epidemic,
n inherent qualities of people that make them sensitive to epidemic diseases.
constitution, fluoric,
n the connection between thin undernourished people (ectomorphic body build) with slack ligaments and hyperextensible joints, and the properties of the homeo-pathic remedy, calcarea fluorica. See also constitution, carbonic; constitution; morphology; constitution, phosphoric; constitution, sulphuric; and typology.
constitution, phosphoric,
n category of body typified by being tall, lanky, and flexible and associated with the calcarea phosphorica homeopathic remedies. See also constitution, carbonic; constitution, fluoric; morphology; and constitution, sulphuric.
constitution, sulphuric,
n category of body typified by being balanced and average. Also called
normolinear constitution. See also carbonic constitution, fluoric constitution, phosphoric constitution, and morphology.

con·sti·tu·tion

(kon'sti-tū'shŭn)
The physical makeup of a body, including the mode of performance of its functions, the activity of its metabolic processes, the manner and degree of its reactions to stimuli, and its power of resistance to the attack of pathogenic organisms or other disease processes.
[L. constitutio, constitution, disposition, fr. constituo, pp. -stitutus, to establish, fr. statuo, to set up]

constitution,

n the general makeup of the body as determined by genetic, physiologic, and biochemical factors. An individual's constitution may be markedly influenced by environment.

constitution

1. the makeup or functional habit of the body.
2. the order in which the atoms of a molecule are joined together.

Patient discussion about constitution

Q. What really constitutes ADD? Don't all kids have short attention spans because they are curious? What I'm saying is. I'm a very curious fellow, so, therefore, I cannot hold my attention to one thing for more than a minute. Does this mean I have ADD?

A. to what you said about how come they didn't have all these problems lots of years ago, I'll have to say it is true the kids today have a lot more stimulations than what kids had a 100 years ago, though, these problems- ADD and ADHD did exist, even with less things around to lose focus to. even about 20 years ago, when the awareness was too small, teachers just called these kids "stupid" or slow, cause they wern't able to listen for a long period of time and then did'nt know what to answer when asked. the awareness helped save lots of very smart focusless kids...

More discussions about constitution
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Under California law, retirement plans often constitute community property.
A question exists about how much work is enough to constitute construction for purposes of section 199.
This problem is being addressed by clearer rules of engagement, which will partly deal with the question of what constitutes architectural knowledge, and how that knowledge is exchanged between those who make the built environment.
In their view, condemning one private use solely to allow development of another does not constitute a public purpose and is therefore unconstitutional.
The California Supreme Court in Bank of the West, however, did not tackle the more basic question of what constitutes advertising.
Children, undifferentiated, usually constitute too sweeping a category, as opposed to these social subdivisions.
And the chapter on A Midsummer Night's Dream, with its metacritical thesis of an intrinsic relationship among colonialist subjectivity, Enlightenment rational progressivism, and psychoanalysis, constitutes a brilliant take on the Shakespeare industry's investment in the postcolonial "imaginary.
Constitute, in the sense of form or make up, may be the best word if neither compose nor comprise seems to fit: Fifty states constitute the United States.
A majority of the members in office constitutes a quorum of the Board for purposes of transacting business except that, if there are five members in office, then four members constitute a quorum.
Pathogens that infect more than one host species are by definition likely to be encountered in several host populations, some of which may constitute infection reservoirs.
Dell's current assets constitute 70 percent of the company's asset base (sourced at www.
The Court concluded that the exposure of the luggage to a canine sniff in the Place case did not constitute a search.