infusion

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infusion

 [in-fu´zhun]
1. the steeping of a substance in water to obtain its soluble principles.
2. the product obtained by this process.
3. the slow therapeutic introduction of fluid other than blood into a vein.
intravenous infusion see intravenous infusion.
subcutaneous infusion hypodermoclysis.

in·fu·sion

(in-fyū'zhŭn),
1. The process of steeping a substance in water, either cold or hot (below the boiling point), to extract its soluble principles.
2. A medicinal preparation obtained by steeping the crude drug in water.
3. The introduction of fluid other than blood, for example, saline solution, into a vein.
[L. infusio, fr. in-fundo, pp. -fusus, to pour in]

infusion

/in·fu·sion/ (in-fu´zhun)
1. the steeping of a substance in water to obtain its soluble principles.
2. the product obtained by this process.
3. the therapeutic introduction of fluid other than blood into a vein.

infusion

(ĭn-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
1. The act or process of infusing.
2.
a. Introduction of a solution into the body through a vein for therapeutic purposes.
b. The solution so introduced: a sucrose infusion.

infusion

[infyo̅o̅′zhən]
Etymology: L, in, within, fundere, to pour
1 the introduction of a substance, such as a fluid, electrolyte, nutrient, or drug, directly into a vein or interstitially by means of gravity flow. Sterile techniques are maintained, the equipment is periodically checked for mechanical difficulties, and the patient is observed for swelling at the site of injection and for cardiac or respiratory difficulties. Compare injection, instillation, insufflate.
2 the substance introduced into the body by infusion.
3 the steeping of a substance, such as an herb, to extract its medicinal properties.
4 a liquid preparation made by pouring water over plant parts (such as dried or fresh leaves, flowers, fruits) and allowing the mixture to steep. Boiling water is usually used, but cold water may also be used. Making a cup of herbal tea is an example. infuse, v.

infusion

Alternative medicine
A herbal preparation in which a ground herb or plant component (e.g., bark, root, nuts or seeds) is boiled in water to obtain an extract of interest (e.g., chamomile, peppermint and rosehips).

Chinese medicine
A general term for a therapeutic tea made from ground herbs, which is boiled, steeped and ingested; in Chinese medicine, the terms herbal tea and infusion may be used interchangeably.

infusion

Mainstream medicine The administration of IV fluids. Parenteral nutrition. Cf Bolus Therapeutics IV infusion The introduction of a fluid, including medications, into the circulation. See Autoinfusion, Continuous infusion, Hepatic arterial infusion, Intracarotid infusion, Intrahepatic infusion, Intraosseous infusion, Intraperitoneal infusion, Intraventricular infusion.

in·fu·sion

(in-fyū'zhŭn)
1. The process of steeping a substance in water, either cold or hot (below the boiling point), to extract its soluble principles.
2. A medicinal preparation obtained by steeping the crude drug in water.
3. The introduction of fluid other than blood, e.g., saline solution, into a vein.
[L. infusio, fr. in-fundo, pp. -fusus, to pour in]

infusion

(in-fu'zhon ) [L. infusio, a pouring into, watering]
1. Any liquid substance (other than blood) introduced into the body for therapeutic purposes.
2. Steeping a substance in hot or cold water in order to obtain its active principle.
3. The product obtained from the process of steeping.

bone marrow infusion

An obsolete term for intraosseous infusion.

continuous infusion

A controlled method of intravenous administration of drugs, fluids, or nutrients given without interruption, instead of by bolus. By adjusting the infusion rate, precise medication dosages or quantities of fluids can be given over time. Therapies administered continuously include some antibiotics, cancer chemotherapies, heparin, insulin, parenteral nutrition, and vasopressors, among others.

continuous hepatic artery infusion

Abbreviation: CHAI
The use of an infusion pump to provide a continuous supply of chemotherapeutic agents to the hepatic artery to control metastases from cancers of the gastrointestinal tract.

continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion

Abbreviation: CSII
Administration of insulin under the skin continuously with an infusion pump connected to a needle inserted beneath the epidermis.
See: insulin pump

intraosseous infusion

A method of obtaining immediate access to the circulation by inserting a needle through the skin, subcutaneous tissues, and periosteum into the marrow cavity of a long bone, usually the proximal tibia. Once access is gained, substances may be injected into the bone marrow, where they are absorbed almost immediately into the general circulation. This avenue of access does not collapse in the presence of shock. Synonym: intraosseous injection

Patient care

Drugs infused intraosseously should be followed by a bolus of 5 mL or more of normal saline.

Enlarge picture
INTRAVENOUS INFUSION TECHNIQUE

intravenous infusion

The injection into a vein of a solution, drugs, or blood components. See: illustration

Solutions

Many liquid preparations are given by intravenous (IV) infusion. Those commonly used include isotonic (normal) saline, lactated Ringer, dextrose 5% in water, and potassium chloride 0.2% in 5% dextrose. The type and quantity depend on the needs of the patient. The solution is usually given continuously at the rate of 1 to 2 or more liters per day. In shock, however, rapid infusion of larger volumes may be necessary to support the circulation.

Site

Intravenous infusion is usually given in the arm through the median basilic or median cephalic vein, but veins at various other sites may be used. The vein must be exposed if a cannula is used. Introduction of solution should be at the rate required to deliver the needed amount of fluid and contained electrolytes, medicines, or nutrients in a prescribed time.

CAUTION!

Intravenous infusions should be discontinued or infusion fluid replenished when the solution being administered is depleted. Clotting of blood in the catheter may occur when the infusion is not continuous.

Patient care

Using scrupulous aseptic technique and universal precautions, the nurse prepares the IV infusion, selects and prepares a venous site, disinfects the skin, inserts an IV catheter or cannula to initiate the infusion (if an IV access is not in place), and secures it in place, restraining joint motion near the insertion site as necessary. The amount of fluid to be infused per hour is calculated and the flow of the prescribed fluid (and additive as appropriate) initiated at the desired flow rate. A pump or controller is typically used to ensure desired volume delivery. After initiating the infusion, the nurse ensures that the correct fluid is being administered at the designated flow rate and observes the infusion site and the patient at least every hour for signs of infiltration or other complications, such as infection, thrombophlebitis, fluid or electrolyte overload, and air embolism. The site dressing and administration set are changed according to protocol. Central venous catheters and lines are associated with more infections and more serious infections and other complications than peripheral catheters and lines. Strict protocols have been developed for their care.

lipid infusion

Hyperalimentation with a fat-containing solution administered intravenously.

neuraxial infusion

An invasive approach to the relief of unremitting pain in which analgesic drugs are injected directly into the spinal fluid.

subcutaneous infusion

The infusion of solutions into the subcutaneous space.

infusion

1. The administration of a fluid other than blood into a vein. Blood infusion is called TRANSFUSION. Fluids given by intravenous infusion include saline (sodium chloride) solutions, DEXTRAN solution, DEXTROSE solution, lactic acid solution, bicarbonate solution and a variety of special mixtures, such as Ringer's and Hartmann's solution.
2. The soaking of a solid substance in a solvent, such as water, for the purpose of extracting an active ingredient.

infusion

the liquid extract of any substance which has been soaked in water.

Infusion

Introduction of a substance directly into a vein or tissue by gravity flow.
Mentioned in: Transfusion

infusion,

n a method of medicine preparation in which aromatic herbs are steeped in hot (slightly below boiling) water. This prevents medicinal constituents from being boiled off.

in·fu·sion

(in-fyū'zhŭn)
1. The process of steeping a substance in water, either cold or hot (below the boiling point), to extract its soluble principles.
2. A medicinal preparation obtained by steeping the crude drug in water.
[L. infusio, fr. in-fundo, pp. -fusus, to pour in]

infusion (infū´zhən),

n 1. the therapeutic introduction of a fluid, such as saline solution, into a vein. In contrast to injection, infusion suggests the introduction of a larger volume of a less concentrated solution over a more protracted period.
2. a term used in pharmacy for a liquid extract prepared by steeping a plant substance in water.

infusion

1. the steeping of a substance in water to obtain its soluble principles.
2. the product obtained by this process, usually leaves, young stems, or petals to produce a tea for oral administration. See also decoction.
3. the slow therapeutic introduction of fluid other than blood into a vein. See also intravenous infusion.
note: An infusion flows in by gravity, an injection is forced in by a syringe, an instillation is dropped in, an insufflation is blown in, and an infection slips in unnoticed.

constant-rate infusion
the continuous intravenous administration of medication usually through an electronic delivery device, in order to maintain constant blood levels. Most suitable for use with rapid onset of action and short half-life.
intramammary infusion
material used to introduce medicaments, especially antibiotics, into the teat and udder sinuses for the treatment or prevention of mastitis. May be in liquid or thin paste form and usually prepackaged in tubes for the treatment of individual quarters. Contain antibiotics and adjuvants in a slow or fast-release base depending on objective, e.g. dry period or lactation period treatment. May contain dye to warn that milk may contain antibiotics. Specially prepared watery infusions of escharotic agents, e.g. silver nitrate, copper sulfate, may be used to dry off permanently a quarter that is chronically affected.
intrauterine infusion
administration of fluids for irrigative purposes.
subcutaneous infusion
administration of fluids directly into subcutaneous tissues for the purpose of providing hydration. See also hypodermoclysis.
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