criminal law

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Related to conspiracy: conspiracy theory

crim·i·nal law

(krimĭ-năl law)
Legislation dealing with crime and its punishment.

criminal law

The area of the law relating to violations of statutes that pertain to public offenses or acts committed against the public. For example, a health care provider can be prosecuted for criminal acts such as assault and battery, fraud, and abuse.
See also: law

criminal law

the law as defined in the Crimes Act, or similar relevant act, which defines what are criminal offences and therefore come within the scope of the Act. The attitude taken is that the part of the offended party in the confrontation to be enacted is the state acting as the champion of all the people.
References in periodicals archive ?
Michael Carter, 27, from Prosser Street, Wolverhampton, faced two charges of conspiracy to supply class A drugs.
William Simon Wells, 43, originally from Lodge Road, Stratford-upon-Avon, faced two charges of conspiracy to supply class A drugs.
com/anatomy-conspiracy-theorist-inside-new-wave-ancient-tradition-1127679) recent article , IBTimes reporter Connor Sheets deconstructed American conspiracy theorists who follow a tradition of questioning authority that may have begun as early as 325 AD.
Today, conspiracy theories thrive thanks to the Internet.
Nicola Heron, 27, of Midway, Walker, pleaded not guilty to conspiracy to supply class B drugs.
Smith must bear the burden of proof since it has already demonstrated that he was part of the conspiracy at one point and that the conspiracy continued.
In the first section of this article we briefly describe the history and doctrine of criminal conspiracy, pointing out problems which have been recognized with conspiracy law wholly unrelated to free speech concerns.
My favourite story about conspiracy theories came from a summertime break.
Abdul Aziz, 41, was sentenced to nine years for conspiracy and nine years, concurrently, for trafficking for sexual exploitation.
Hamid Safi, 22, an illegal immigrant of no fixed address, was jailed for four years for conspiracy and one year, concurrently, for trafficking, Express.
James John, 34, also known as Big Jim, is charged with conspiracy to hold a person in servitude, conspiracy to require a person to perform forced labour, assault occasioning actual bodily harm, holding a person in servitude, requiring a person to perform forced labour, and battery.
A conspiracy is distinct from the substantive crime contemplated by